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June 17, 2009

Argentinean materials, a roiling economy, and a pinch of personal tumult served as the recipe for furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti’s Buenos Aires oasis.

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  Dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the master bedroom a warm, peaceful feel. Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants 
from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    Dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the master bedroom a warm, peaceful feel. Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  The house peeks out from a scrim of greenery.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    The house peeks out from a scrim of greenery.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  Sticotti and Hernaez relax in their living room, where custom-built windows and sliding doors enhance the indoor-outdoor effect.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    Sticotti and Hernaez relax in their living room, where custom-built windows and sliding doors enhance the indoor-outdoor effect.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  Hernaez organizes CDs on a modular lapacho wood shelf designed by Sticotti.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    Hernaez organizes CDs on a modular lapacho wood shelf designed by Sticotti.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  The couple relax in their open-plan kitchen with their twelve-year-old lab, Uma.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    The couple relax in their open-plan kitchen with their twelve-year-old lab, Uma.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  In the kitchen, buffed concrete floors, chrome globe lights, and a fleet of Bertoia chairs comprise a sleek backdrop for quirkier pieces like the marble-topped wooden tables from a Catholic school, snagged at a local flea market. The secret to the spare, uncluttered shelves? A dispensa, or walk-in pantry, down the hall. “We hide everything we don’t want to see,” Sticotti explains. “We don’t want to have to look at brands.”  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    In the kitchen, buffed concrete floors, chrome globe lights, and a fleet of Bertoia chairs comprise a sleek backdrop for quirkier pieces like the marble-topped wooden tables from a Catholic school, snagged at a local flea market. The secret to the spare, uncluttered shelves? A dispensa, or walk-in pantry, down the hall. “We hide everything we don’t want to see,” Sticotti explains. “We don’t want to have to look at brands.”

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  The wood-and-steel open staircase wends its way up three stories, supported by a concrete structural wall embedded with PVC tubes and bare lightbulbs.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    The wood-and-steel open staircase wends its way up three stories, supported by a concrete structural wall embedded with PVC tubes and bare lightbulbs.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  The master bedroom.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    The master bedroom.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  Even the economy has regions, Alejandro Sticotti and Mercedes Hernaez discovered when Argentina's economy collapsed. This led them to build a house from local woods and materials, creating a house that is "of Argentina"—and proud of it. Here, a ground-level patio and third-floor deck overlook a lush front garden; sitting out there is like “being on vacation,” says Hernaez.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma
    Even the economy has regions, Alejandro Sticotti and Mercedes Hernaez discovered when Argentina's economy collapsed. This led them to build a house from local woods and materials, creating a house that is "of Argentina"—and proud of it. Here, a ground-level patio and third-floor deck overlook a lush front garden; sitting out there is like “being on vacation,” says Hernaez.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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