Must-See Modern Beach Houses on Fire Island Tour

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August 12, 2013
A sneak preview of the modern house tours coming to Fire Island this summer, including the work of architects Horace Gifford, Harry Bates, and Andrew Geller. Read Full Article
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  547 Beachcomber Walk by architect Andrew Geller (1958-61), Restoration helmed by Larson and Paul Architects in 2006.
    547 Beachcomber Walk by architect Andrew Geller (1958-61), Restoration helmed by Larson and Paul Architects in 2006.
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  519 Porgie Walk by Horace Gifford (1963). Restored in 1983 by Bromley Caldari Architects.
    519 Porgie Walk by Horace Gifford (1963). Restored in 1983 by Bromley Caldari Architects.
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  214 Beach Hill Walk by Don Page (1962). Restored by Rawlins Design in 2013, by principal Chris Rawlins, who will be leading the modernism tours.
    214 Beach Hill Walk by Don Page (1962). Restored by Rawlins Design in 2013, by principal Chris Rawlins, who will be leading the modernism tours.
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  252 Bay Walk by Horace Gifford (1972-75). This house owes certain elements, like its "disembodied facade reminiscent of the oversized shading devices" to Paul Rudolph's work.
    252 Bay Walk by Horace Gifford (1972-75). This house owes certain elements, like its "disembodied facade reminiscent of the oversized shading devices" to Paul Rudolph's work.
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  616 Shore Walk by Marcel Bretos (1971).
    616 Shore Walk by Marcel Bretos (1971).
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  274 Bay Walk by Harry Bates, now of Bates Masi (1967).
    274 Bay Walk by Harry Bates, now of Bates Masi (1967).
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  266 Bay Walk by Horace Gifford (1968). Gifford wrote of the house, also encapsulating his work as an architect, that "The outstanding feature of the house is that we did not diminish the beauty of the site in any way. Glass tends not to enclose—that's why we used so much of it."
    266 Bay Walk by Horace Gifford (1968). Gifford wrote of the house, also encapsulating his work as an architect, that "The outstanding feature of the house is that we did not diminish the beauty of the site in any way. Glass tends not to enclose—that's why we used so much of it."
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  632 Fire Island Boulevard by James McCleod (1969).
    632 Fire Island Boulevard by James McCleod (1969).

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