written by:
May 17, 2013
In the penultimate chapter of our series on the 100 most popular projects ever published in Dwell, a selection of homes including a few mid-century favorites, a tree house in Canada, and more. View 1-20 here, 21-40 here, 41-60 here.
residential urban wooden box harpoon house
All We Need

This pair of handy Portlanders doesn’t crave any more of Oregon’s territory than what’s taken up by their 704-square-foot home, hard-working garden, and smartly designed outdoor spaces. Photo by John Clark.

 

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Small Wooden Box Home in Portland
1 / 20
prospect heights residence kitchen family portrait
Top Brass

A couple takes a minimalist approach to their Brooklyn apartment, focusing on supple materials, subtle gradations of color, and custom finishes by local craftsmen. Photo by Matthew Williams.

Originally appeared in Kitchens We Love: Part 2
2 / 20
A kitchen that opens onto the garden is the complete antithesis of Jakarta’s often dim and dingy suburban interiors.
Jakarta, Indonesia

In the Indonesian capital of Jakarta, Ahmad Djuhara is on a one-man crusade to blow away the conservative cobwebs of the city’s dowdy suburban architecture. Photo by Matthew Williams.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Jakarta, Indonesia
3 / 20
Atop a warehouse/office building overlooking Seattle’s Salmon Bay waterway, Tom Bayley’s home watches over a 250-slip marina. Few tenants below notice his presence, except when errant drops from his watering can fall from his deck, 25 feet above.
Sky Small

Building a small home doesn’t equate to easy lifting. Before Tom Bayley could call in a crane to lift the materials for his 800-square-foot house to the roof of the building on which it’s perched, he had to tackle a radical retrofit to shore up the structure. Photo by John Clark.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Sky Small
4 / 20
The exterior facade of the renovated Victorian Everett House in Louisville Kentucky.
A Well-Grafted Home

Working creatively to meet strict preservation codes, architect Roberto de Leon affixes a modern annex onto a historic Louisville house. Photo by Noah Webb.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in A Well-Grafted Home
5 / 20
addition, austin, texas, rick black architect
Double Time

The last time Blake Trabulsi and Allison Orr had a party at their house in Austin, Texas, it lasted until 5 a.m. Observes Trabulsi: “People are so comfortable here, they never want to leave.” Photo by Jack Thompson.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Double Time
6 / 20
Chelsea and Arthur Jackson renovated their fourth-floor condominium to include a custom Bulthaup kitchen.
Chef's Table

When these full-time foodies renovated their Chicago condo, getting the kitchen right meant finding the right kitchen island. Photo by Matthew Williams.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Chef's Table
7 / 20
Modern kitchen dining area with Louis Poulsen and Tom Dixon pendant lights
Long Island Found

When the Fisher family’s 1960s Long Island beach bungalow started to crumble, they sought an architect who’d preserve the home’s humble roots and mellow vibe, while subtly bringing the place up to date. Photo by Richard Foulser.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Long Island Found
8 / 20
Modern spacious dining room with concrete flooring
Paint It Black

A family of cost-conscious Hamburgers (freshly back in Germany after years abroad) converted a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home. Photo by Mark Seelen.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Paint it Black
9 / 20
Walls and ceilings made out of reclaimed butternut wood
In the Loop

Adrian Jones lived in his top-floor loft in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood for nine years before renovating. For a bachelor set designer, the 2,500-square-foot space was perfect: plenty of room for his studio and collections of books and art, big windows affording city views, and exposed brick tagged with graffiti.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in In the Loop
10 / 20
Kitchen dining area with long, rectangular bottom floor
See What Develops

By keeping the budget strict, the insulation tight, and its values clear, Philadelphia’s Postgreen Homes shows a little brotherly love for green, urban housing.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Green Urban Housing in Philadelphia
11 / 20
Sustainable home with galvanized steel shed roof and siding
Into the Great Wide Open

For this rural Ontario home, building sustainably was less about high-tech gizmos than learning to truly love the land. Photo by Derek Shapton.

Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© Derek Shapton
Originally appeared in A Sustainably Built Home in Rural Ontario
12 / 20
Small Amidst Sprawl

Rising out of the Texas bayou, Houston is both a sprawling metropolis and the largest city in the United States without zoning regulations. This cause-and-effect relationship has, over time, resulted in a hodgepodge of land use and a multitude of architectural styles that give the city its most unique alias, a city without memory. Photo by Misty Keasler.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Small Amidst Sprawl
13 / 20
Australia kitchen
Glazed Old Fashioned

On a shady street just off the main drag of Melbourne, Australia’s hippest inner suburb, a pair of creative types and their two kids have made a bright, cheery home by renovating an 1860s stable, oddly named “Villa Boston.”

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Glazed Old Fashioned
14 / 20
Norwegian Wood

Designing a house for this setting was a thrilling puzzle of aesthetics and terrain for a young architect. The house they built that year suited the couple for 30 years of long summer vacations, but recently, as Kiehl tells us, it was time for an upgrade.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Norwegian Wood
15 / 20
Ray Kappe relaxes in the central living space, which offers views onto other shared family zones. Behind him is a view down into his office. Half a level up, Shelly Kappe stands at the entrance to the upper family room.
Level Best

Los Angeles architect Ray Kappe built a multilevel house for his family back in 1967, and the results still resonate today. Photo by João Canziani.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Ray Kappe-Designed Multilevel House in Los Angeles
16 / 20
The Fung/Blatt family enjoys the backyard of their Mount Washington home. Despite its 5,000-square-foot lot, the house is just 1,640 square feet. Michael Blatt admits, “If we could add anything to this house, it would be five walk-in closets.”
Domestic Democracy

In a code-happy L.A. suburb, how do you break the mold without breaking the law? Architects Alice Fung and Michael Blatt steer clear of anarchy with a little democratic design. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Domestic Democracy
17 / 20
Twin houses face off in La Jolla across wide-open walls and decking. The design held such appeal that the architect claimed one 2inn for himself.
Double the Pleasure

These twin sun-drenched San Diego abodes prove that two decks are better than one. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Double the Pleasure
18 / 20
Eighteen-foot-long ribs run from top to bottom to form the treehouse's struts. The floor package runs into the ribs and creates a triangle, which negated the need for more structural support. During construction, Allen broke one of the long ribs but rathe
Dream Hatcher

Joel Allen had always dreamed of building his own home and this miniature treehouse was the first step.

Originally appeared in Dream Hatcher
19 / 20
courtyard house exterior side
Inside Job

Designing an innovative house is a rite of passage 
for many young architects. But building in a city doesn’t always make experimentation easy; after all, neighbors have their own ideas about how a block is supposed to look. Photo by Juliana Sohn.

Originally appeared in Growth Spurt
20 / 20
residential urban wooden box harpoon house
All We Need

This pair of handy Portlanders doesn’t crave any more of Oregon’s territory than what’s taken up by their 704-square-foot home, hard-working garden, and smartly designed outdoor spaces. Photo by John Clark.

 

Photo by John Clark.

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...