written by:
photos by:
September 7, 2010
Originally published in Ten Years Of Dwell
as
The Design Trade

In a South Minneapolis neighborhood of century-old housing stock, Julie Snow’s bold but elegant residential design fulfilled Andrew Blauvelt and Scott Winter’s desire for a loft on the ground.

Blauvelt and Winter ground their soaring two-story living room with classics such as Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair and ottoman, a Noguchi coffee table, an Eames wire-base table and a Danish teak credenza, which displays their collection of pottery and a pair
Blauvelt and Winter ground their soaring two-story living room with classics such as Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair and ottoman, a Noguchi coffee table, an Eames wire-base table and a Danish teak credenza, which displays their collection of pottery and a pair of Martz lamps made by Marshall Studios. Flor carpet tiles help add color to the neutral palette.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
1 / 29
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
2 / 29
The home’s mix of dark ipe wood, concrete, and glass give credence to Winter’s description of it as “an open bunker.”
The home’s mix of dark ipe wood, concrete, and glass give credence to Winter’s description of it as “an open bunker.”
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
3 / 29
A portion of Blauvelt’s 3,000-book library is archived in the long entry hall where the geometry of a Noguchi lamp plays off a pair of minimalist prints by Daniel Buren.
A portion of Blauvelt’s 3,000-book library is archived in the long entry hall where the geometry of a Noguchi lamp plays off a pair of minimalist prints by Daniel Buren.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
4 / 29
A loveseat and two Neo arm chairs by Niels Bendtsen in the living room offer Blauvelt a light-filled view to the courtyard beyond.
A loveseat and two Neo arm chairs by Niels Bendtsen in the living room offer Blauvelt a light-filled view to the courtyard beyond.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
5 / 29
The kitchen forms the centerpiece of the main living space.
The kitchen forms the centerpiece of the main living space.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
6 / 29
The kitchen features cabinets by carpenter James LaChance, Hanstone quartz countertops, Electrolux Icon Series appliances, and a Jenn-Air exhaust hood.
The kitchen features cabinets by carpenter James LaChance, Hanstone quartz countertops, Electrolux Icon Series appliances, and a Jenn-Air exhaust hood.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
7 / 29
This limited-edition ceramic plate by artist Takashi Murakami was specially commissioned for the Walker Art Center.
This limited-edition ceramic plate by artist Takashi Murakami was specially commissioned for the Walker Art Center.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
8 / 29
A monumental German climate map enlivens the dining area, which also sports CH 23 & CH 30 chairs by Hans Wegner.
A monumental German climate map enlivens the dining area, which also sports CH 23 & CH 30 chairs by Hans Wegner.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
9 / 29
The master bathroom has a bamboo screen and a Deauville tub by Victoria + Albert. A vintage enameled metal sign from the London Underground is framed by the screen and a cactus that sits atop an African stool.
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Courtesy of 
� Dean Kaufman 2010 All Rights Reserved
10 / 29
A pair of mid-century Martz lamps flank the Parsons bed from Room & Board in the master bedroom.
A pair of mid-century Martz lamps flank the Parsons bed from Room & Board in the master bedroom.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
� Dean Kaufman 2010 All Rights Reserved
11 / 29
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
12 / 29
Winter takes care of chores like tree trimming and the tending of his succulents.
Winter takes care of chores like tree trimming and the tending of his succulents.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
13 / 29
A tall steel gate grants entry to the courtyard.
A tall steel gate grants entry to the courtyard.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
14 / 29
Friends gather in the courtyard to make the most of Minneapolis's limited temperate times.
Friends gather in the courtyard to make the most of Minneapolis's limited temperate times.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
15 / 29
Here on the patio you can see that rigid grid that Blauvelt so likes at play in the landscape designed by <a href="http://www.ro-lu.com/">rosenlof/lucas</a>.
Here on the patio you can see that rigid grid that Blauvelt so likes at play in the landscape designed by rosenlof/lucas.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
16 / 29
Design tomes, a salient message, mid-century ceramic.
Design tomes, a salient message, mid-century ceramic.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
17 / 29
Here's a proper view of the back of the house that reveals the height of the space and how the courtyard really does function as an outdoor room.
Here's a proper view of the back of the house that reveals the height of the space and how the courtyard really does function as an outdoor room.
Photo by 
18 / 29
By dint of the double-height ceiling in the dining area, the master bedroom has a nice view out to the courtyard. Though a mere pull of a pair of curtains is all that's needed to block out the light.
By dint of the double-height ceiling in the dining area, the master bedroom has a nice view out to the courtyard. Though a mere pull of a pair of curtains is all that's needed to block out the light.
Photo by 
19 / 29
Noguchi lamp, meet the business-card-carrying ceramic monkey.
Noguchi lamp, meet the business-card-carrying ceramic monkey.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
20 / 29
The neighbors get a glimpse of what goes on in the Blauvelt-Winters courtyard.
The neighbors get a glimpse of what goes on in the Blauvelt-Winters courtyard.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
21 / 29
Blauvelt sits at his Parsons dining table from Room and Board.
Blauvelt sits at his Parsons dining table from Room and Board.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
22 / 29
Cheeky posters in the hall belie Blauvelt's training as a graphic designer.
Cheeky posters in the hall belie Blauvelt's training as a graphic designer.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
23 / 29
The darker gray garage door offers a chromatic and textural contrast to the concrete shell.
The darker gray garage door offers a chromatic and textural contrast to the concrete shell.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
24 / 29
The study houses not only a pair of plastic Eames shell chairs but much of the couple's large collection of architecture and design books.
The study houses not only a pair of plastic Eames shell chairs but much of the couple's large collection of architecture and design books.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
25 / 29
The sight line down the stairs leads right past the dining room table and out toward the coutyard.
The sight line down the stairs leads right past the dining room table and out toward the coutyard.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
26 / 29
Which is the true design classic: the Eames rockers, Eames Wire Base Table, or those tasty M&Ms?
Which is the true design classic: the Eames rockers, Eames Wire Base Table, or those tasty M&Ms?
Photo by 
27 / 29
Scott Winter determines precisely what his laptop is telling him at the kitchen bar. The poster on the wall behind him celebrates the Schubert opera Snow White.
Scott Winter determines precisely what his laptop is telling him at the kitchen bar. The poster on the wall behind him celebrates the Schubert opera Snow White.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
28 / 29
Here's another view of the mid-century ceramics the couple collects and displays around the house.
Here's another view of the mid-century ceramics the couple collects and displays around the house.
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
Dean Kaufman 2010
29 / 29
Blauvelt and Winter ground their soaring two-story living room with classics such as Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair and ottoman, a Noguchi coffee table, an Eames wire-base table and a Danish teak credenza, which displays their collection of pottery and a pair
Blauvelt and Winter ground their soaring two-story living room with classics such as Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair and ottoman, a Noguchi coffee table, an Eames wire-base table and a Danish teak credenza, which displays their collection of pottery and a pair of Martz lamps made by Marshall Studios. Flor carpet tiles help add color to the neutral palette. Image courtesy of Dean Kaufman 2010.
Project 
Blauvelt-Winter Residence
Architect 

It all began in Marfa, Texas, a decade ago, when Andrew Blauvelt, the design director and curator at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and Julie Snow, principal of Julie Snow Architects, both attended the inauguration of Dan Flavin’s seminal fluorescent light works at the Chinati Foundation. Flavin’s work was commanding, but it was Donald Judd’s concrete sculptures near the perimeter of the Chinati property that seduced Blauvelt. He was intrigued by the interface of the bunkerlike concrete slabs with the flat open land and loved the rhythm of Judd’s repeating forms. In a “Eureka!” moment Blauvelt knew a concrete home would be in his future.

But it wasn’t until after the trip that a deal between the two would be cemented: Blauvelt would go to work on Snow’s monograph Julie Snow Architects for Princeton Architectural Press if she would design him a home. Around the same time, Blauvelt was in the midst of a nascent relationship with colleague Scott Winter, the Walker’s director of the annual fund. The two began sharing living quarters in lofts in both Minneapolis and St. Paul. “What we really wanted was a loft on the ground with an open plan, but not a condo,” says Winter. But finding a city lot near the Walker, a must given their demanding schedules, was no small task.

In 2004 Blauvelt found a lot for sale at the intersection of a four-lane artery and a two-lane cross street. The approximately 40-by-120-foot site had been vacant for decades and offered mature walnut and honey locust trees. Better yet, it was just over two miles from the office. At that moment, Blauvelt was entrenched in the Walker exhibition Some Assembly Required: Contemporary Prefabricated Houses, and he had prefab on the brain. But he kept coming back to Judd’s concrete sculptures. “I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” he states. “The challenge, though, was to build a modern house that didn’t cost a million, but was still in the city.” Winter adds, “After all, we’re just two people working for a nonprofit.”

A portion of Blauvelt’s 3,000-book library is archived in the long entry hall where the geometry of a Noguchi lamp plays off a pair of minimalist prints by Daniel Buren.
A portion of Blauvelt’s 3,000-book library is archived in the long entry hall where the geometry of a Noguchi lamp plays off a pair of minimalist prints by Daniel Buren. Image courtesy of Dean Kaufman 2010.
For Snow, the question was, how to create a personal space on a busy urban street corner? “In a city, your home is your urban retreat. It needs to encompass both a public and private persona,” she explains. “You need to be able to remove yourself but still engage.”

The deeply collaborative design process that ensued felt more like an architect-to-architect dialogue than an architect-to-client discussion. Snow shared sketches with Blauvelt and he drew designs to send back. Later, the trio would meet, handling chunks of concrete, wood, metal, glass, and other inspirational materials, to get a real sense of their tactility and material relationship. “Andrew is not trained in architecture, but he knows more about design than many architects,” Snow says. “His library of design and architecture books is the most extensive of anyone I know. He’s compositional—he thinks in composed elements.”

Ultimately, that graphic designer’s orderly sense resulted in a 24-foot-grid module that determined the house’s design. The flat-roofed concrete, wood, and glass house is essentially two joined 24-foot cubes, a similarly sized 16-foot-long walled courtyard, and a 24-by-24-foot garage. Blauvelt describes the nearly 2,000-square-foot home as “unheroic,” and adds, “The grid design is a graphic control of the space.”

“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says. Image courtesy of Dean Kaufman 2010.
In an effort to stay as green as possible, the team used an energy-efficient T-Mass insulated concrete wall system, developed by Dow Chemical Company, to construct the 11.5-inch-thick first-floor walls. Like a concrete sandwich, the walls are fabricated from self-consolidating concrete (SCC) filled with rigid foam insulation. The somewhat pillowy SCC finish suited the picky pair perfectly—not too rough, like a parking ramp, nor too smooth, like a polished floor. “Concrete was an easy solution, and it’s cheap. It is the simple things that make this place so special,” says Blauvelt.

In contrast to the concrete, ipe—a dense, hard, rot-resistant wood—clads the second floor. The rich red-brown of the long horizontal ipe planks nicely sets off the unpigmented concrete below. But the real atmospheric tour de force is the rear, east-facing glass wall that rises the structure’s full two stories. “The light is beautiful but the wall is awfully revealing from the east,” Blauvelt says. In another highly graphic move—designers do love their grids—Blauvelt notes that the window modulation is in two-, three-, and four-foot combinations, comparing it to a mathematics game.

One game that the couple rejects, however, is the one where a seemingly agoraphobic modernist, flat-roofed home on a large lot carefully camouflages itself behind trees and a large lawn. Rather, the house is exposed to everyone, in a neighborhood largely featuring early 20th-century homes and apartments. “It is a response to a corner lot at a busy intersection,” says Snow. And although it is unique to the neighborhood, “it fits the city and the pattern of the neighborhood’s older housing stock—front yard, porch, house, yard, and garage—but with an updated design sense,” she says.

A monumental German climate map enlivens the dining area, which also sports CH 23 & CH 30 chairs by Hans Wegner.
A monumental German climate map enlivens the dining area, which also sports CH 23 & CH 30 chairs by Hans Wegner. Image courtesy of Dean Kaufman 2010.
It turns out that they’ve built their own version of a 100-year house. “I like the idea that, one day, 100 years from now, this box could still be here provid-ing shelter,” says Winter. “It wasn’t the goal of our construction, but we’ve constructed a modern, sustainable century house.” Blauvelt adds, “It is our gift to the community. The house will outlast us.”

The house’s aim, to create a calming private space on a well-trod urban corner, is manifested through the crisp grid design and the master stroke of Snow’s plan: the malleable central courtyard, which seamlessly morphs from a serene retreat to a space that easily houses bustling parties. It’s also the 
perfect spot for a morning cup of coffee in the sun, a nicely shaded lunch, and a cool place for cocktails and dinner in the warmer months. “It is scaled perfectly for two but can easily accommodate 20 to 25 guests,” comments Winter. “It’s a bit of a miracle that way.”

“The center courtyard is the focal point of the house and that space is meant to be a sanctuary, a calming focus for us,” Blauvelt continues. “The house is a great respite from the Walker’s busy event schedule, and we simply take refuge in it from the demands of our public life. It becomes even more important in Minneapolis as you are denied access to outdoor living so much of the year.”

With Snow’s monograph and the Blauvelt-Winter House completed, the designers’ bargain is satisfied and each is thrilled with the results. The architect’s monograph benefits from a clean, careful design, and the couple got just what they wanted: a simple house with a keen sense of material, scale, and proportion. Their sole regret: “I didn’t build a library,” Blauvelt sighs.

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