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Modern Renovations for Historic Buildings

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When you need more modern space, but are constrained by historic building codes, adding an incongruous addition can be the best option.
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  With the help of architects Heidi Beebe and Doug Skidmore, Dan and Dana Zuckerman were able to add a master suite upstairs and kitchen, pantry, powder room, and covered patio downstairs without disturbing their traditional 1910 American foursquare (Front of the house shown). Photo by Lincoln Barbour   Photo by: Lincoln BarbourCourtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

    With the help of architects Heidi Beebe and Doug Skidmore, Dan and Dana Zuckerman were able to add a master suite upstairs and kitchen, pantry, powder room, and covered patio downstairs without disturbing their traditional 1910 American foursquare (Front of the house shown). Photo by Lincoln Barbour 

    Photo by: Lincoln Barbour

    Courtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

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  According to Dana, “Heidi and Doug took into account the scale and proportion of the existing rooms when designing the addition and carried the fir flooring and trim through to the new spaces. That’s what makes the addition feel like it’s part of the house.” (Back of the house shown). Photo by Lincoln Barbour   Photo by: Lincoln BarbourCourtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

    According to Dana, “Heidi and Doug took into account the scale and proportion of the existing rooms when designing the addition and carried the fir flooring and trim through to the new spaces. That’s what makes the addition feel like it’s part of the house.” (Back of the house shown). Photo by Lincoln Barbour 

    Photo by: Lincoln Barbour

    Courtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

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  To integrate a former postman’s cottage with the new design, architect David Sheppard added a concrete column adjacent to an existing stone chimney and a new slate chimney “at the heart of the composition.” From this, the roof structure fans out and the small stone structure now serves as an anteroom.  Photo by: Joakim Boren Courtesy of: Joakim Boren

    To integrate a former postman’s cottage with the new design, architect David Sheppard added a concrete column adjacent to an existing stone chimney and a new slate chimney “at the heart of the composition.” From this, the roof structure fans out and the small stone structure now serves as an anteroom.

    Photo by: Joakim Boren

    Courtesy of: Joakim Boren

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  This striking contrast between the original 1780s cottage and a large timber-framed addition whose tin cladding and banks of glass give the effect of a semitransparent shed opening up to the landscape. Architect Piers Taylor decided that a lightweight raised structure would best suit the site and get around the problems of building on unsteady land liable to subsidence. The extension includes two more bedrooms and two bathrooms upstairs, and a large, open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen on the ground floor. It not only succeeds in creating a working home for a family of five, but compellingly combines the old stone cottage with the contemporary belvedere. Photo by Ben Anders  Photo by: Ben Anders

    This striking contrast between the original 1780s cottage and a large timber-framed addition whose tin cladding and banks of glass give the effect of a semitransparent shed opening up to the landscape. Architect Piers Taylor decided that a lightweight raised structure would best suit the site and get around the problems of building on unsteady land liable to subsidence. The extension includes two more bedrooms and two bathrooms upstairs, and a large, open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen on the ground floor. It not only succeeds in creating a working home for a family of five, but compellingly combines the old stone cottage with the contemporary belvedere. Photo by Ben Anders

    Photo by: Ben Anders

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  Working creatively to meet strict preservation codes, architect Roberto de Leon affixed a modern annex onto a historic Louisville house. From the outset, there were challenges. De Leon and project manager David Mayo had to design a structure whose modern flair wouldn’t clash with its surroundings, while also passing muster with Louisville’s strict Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission.De Leon and Mayo documented every structure within a six-block area, taking design cues from the lean-tos and semi-detached sheds found in many of the neighborhood’s backyards. They proposed cladding the addition in fiber-cement lap siding and painting it dark forest green, a color commonly found on historic Kentucky plantation houses. “That was a way for us to make a case for the scale of the addition, the materials, and even the detailing to the landmarks board as a way to say, ‘This is really in character with everything that’s around this neighborhood,’” de Leon says. Photos by Noah Webb   Photo by: Noah Webb
    Working creatively to meet strict preservation codes, architect Roberto de Leon affixed a modern annex onto a historic Louisville house. From the outset, there were challenges. De Leon and project manager David Mayo had to design a structure whose modern flair wouldn’t clash with its surroundings, while also passing muster with Louisville’s strict Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission.

    De Leon and Mayo documented every structure within a six-block area, taking design cues from the lean-tos and semi-detached sheds found in many of the neighborhood’s backyards. They proposed cladding the addition in fiber-cement lap siding and painting it dark forest green, a color commonly found on historic Kentucky plantation houses. “That was a way for us to make a case for the scale of the addition, the materials, and even the detailing to the landmarks board as a way to say, ‘This is really in character with everything that’s around this neighborhood,’” de Leon says. Photos by Noah Webb

     

    Photo by: Noah Webb

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  When Hinnerk Ehlers and Katja Winterhalder moved their family to Hamburg, Germany, they knew what they wanted: a supercool, minimal, modernist house. A tiny 1907 villa with faux masonry and a 1960s minimart attached did not fit the bill. For assistance, they drew on the know-how of Berlin-based architect Frank Drewes, of the firm Drewes+Strenge Arkitekten, whose father designed the modernist house Winterhalder grew up in. Inspired by the minimal color scheme of a hotel they stayed at in Bali, Winterhalder and Ehlers decided to limit their palette to three colors: anthracite black, concrete gray, and a light larch wood. The first move was to paint the backyard wall gray. Next up for a coat of dark paint was the villa’s old-fashioned wooden staircase, which the couple didn’t like but didn’t have the budget to replace. The consistency works to unite the different styles found in the house. “Somehow,” says Winterhalder, “it all fits.” Photo by Mark Seelen  Photo by: Mark Seelen

    When Hinnerk Ehlers and Katja Winterhalder moved their family to Hamburg, Germany, they knew what they wanted: a supercool, minimal, modernist house. A tiny 1907 villa with faux masonry and a 1960s minimart attached did not fit the bill. For assistance, they drew on the know-how of Berlin-based architect Frank Drewes, of the firm Drewes+Strenge Arkitekten, whose father designed the modernist house Winterhalder grew up in. Inspired by the minimal color scheme of a hotel they stayed at in Bali, Winterhalder and Ehlers decided to limit their palette to three colors: anthracite black, concrete gray, and a light larch wood. The first move was to paint the backyard wall gray. Next up for a coat of dark paint was the villa’s old-fashioned wooden staircase, which the couple didn’t like but didn’t have the budget to replace. The consistency works to unite the different styles found in the house. “Somehow,” says Winterhalder, “it all fits.” Photo by Mark Seelen

    Photo by: Mark Seelen

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  Looking at the traditional Victorian facade of Kylie Brammy and George Kyprianou’s home, you would never imagine it hid such a voluptuous and modern derrière. Physiotherapist Brammy and entrepreneur Kyprianou bought the North Adelaide house in 1999 because they loved its charm and location on the city fringe, close to parkland. Less desirable was its tiny kitchen, dark living spaces, and badly positioned toilet, just three feet from the dining table. Engaging both an architect and an interior designer to collaborate on a renovation and two-story extension, the couple managed to open up the interior and transform the back of the house into an improbably airy and light-filled retreat. Photo by James Knowler  Photo by: James KnowlerCourtesy of: James Knowler Photography

    Looking at the traditional Victorian facade of Kylie Brammy and George Kyprianou’s home, you would never imagine it hid such a voluptuous and modern derrière. Physiotherapist Brammy and entrepreneur Kyprianou bought the North Adelaide house in 1999 because they loved its charm and location on the city fringe, close to parkland. Less desirable was its tiny kitchen, dark living spaces, and badly positioned toilet, just three feet from the dining table. Engaging both an architect and an interior designer to collaborate on a renovation and two-story extension, the couple managed to open up the interior and transform the back of the house into an improbably airy and light-filled retreat. Photo by James Knowler

    Photo by: James Knowler

    Courtesy of: James Knowler Photography

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  Brammy and Kyprianou hardly touched the front of their house, an 1880 sandstone and brick Victorian with galvanized iron ornamentation. Photo by James Knowler  Photo by: James KnowlerCourtesy of: James Knowler Photography

    Brammy and Kyprianou hardly touched the front of their house, an 1880 sandstone and brick Victorian with galvanized iron ornamentation. Photo by James Knowler

    Photo by: James Knowler

    Courtesy of: James Knowler Photography

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