Material Focus: Concrete

written by:
July 19, 2013
In this Material Focus installment, we examine béton brut—roughly finished exposed concrete—a modern design idea popularized by architects like Le Corbusier and Auguste Perret.
  • 
  In this Material Focus installment, we examine béton brut—roughly finished exposed concrete—a modern design idea popularized by architects like Le Corbusier and Auguste Perret.For a family in Lima, a 
team from local firm
 51-1 Arquitectos built 
Casa Serpiente, which 
meanders around 25 existing trees. Concrete is used extensively in the house, seen here on the ceiling of the office and walls of the pool. Lush foliage softens the rough-hewn surfaces. Photo by: Cristobal Palma

    In this Material Focus installment, we examine béton brut—roughly finished exposed concrete—a modern design idea popularized by architects like Le Corbusier and Auguste Perret.

    For a family in Lima, a 
team from local firm
 51-1 Arquitectos built 
Casa Serpiente, which 
meanders around 25 existing trees. Concrete is used extensively in the house, seen here on the ceiling of the office and walls of the pool. Lush foliage softens the rough-hewn surfaces. Photo by: Cristobal Palma

  • 
  “In every project, we try to do one thing that’s handmade, a custom design where the only way we could afford to do it is if we did it ourselves,” says architect Meejin Yoon. For a house Yoon designed for her parents in Arlington, Virginia, the handmade detail was a cast-concrete fountain located in a compact courtyard.  Photo by: Jeff Wolfram

    “In every project, we try to do one thing that’s handmade, a custom design where the only way we could afford to do it is if we did it ourselves,” says architect Meejin Yoon. For a house Yoon designed for her parents in Arlington, Virginia, the handmade detail was a cast-concrete fountain located in a compact courtyard.

    Photo by: Jeff Wolfram

  • 
  Concrete stairs factor into the landscaping surrounding a modern house in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by: Dean Kaufman  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Concrete stairs factor into the landscaping surrounding a modern house in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

  • 
  “My apartment in Brussels is the most architect-like, with its concrete feel,” De Smedt says of his rather brutalist interior. “It puzzles me why more people aren’t into concrete—it’s the most practical material. It’s warm, if you do it right. And you can clean it in about two seconds.” Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse  Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    “My apartment in Brussels is the most architect-like, with its concrete feel,” De Smedt says of his rather brutalist interior. “It puzzles me why more people aren’t into concrete—it’s the most practical material. It’s warm, if you do it right. And you can clean it in about two seconds.” Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

  • 
  Textured concrete walls are a signature of architect Byoung-soo Cho’s work. Here, he relaxes in the first-floor living room, where paintings by up-and-coming Germany-based Chinese artist Ruo Bing Chen play off a sofa and coffee table designed by the architect himself. Photo by: Jeremy Murch  Photo by: Jeremy Murch

    Textured concrete walls are a signature of architect Byoung-soo Cho’s work. Here, he relaxes in the first-floor living room, where paintings by up-and-coming Germany-based Chinese artist Ruo Bing Chen play off a sofa and coffee table designed by the architect himself. Photo by: Jeremy Murch

    Photo by: Jeremy Murch

@current / @total

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...