Long Island Summer Home Gets a Modern Addition

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photos by:
March 4, 2009
Originally published in Before & After
as
Time and Again
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  Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  The exterior, as seen in the 1970s.
    The exterior, as seen in the 1970s.
  • 
  The living room, before renovation.
    The living room, before renovation.
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  Dolce sits on a vintage 1950s couch he found at a thrift store in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Dolce and Burnham had the couch and the Donghia armchair recovered in a stain-resistant Sunbrella fabric by Andrew Grossman Upholstery. The Flokati rug was picked up at a thrift store in Florida. Hanging on the wall behind Dolce is a piece of art by British painter Tom Hammick.
    Dolce sits on a vintage 1950s couch he found at a thrift store in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Dolce and Burnham had the couch and the Donghia armchair recovered in a stain-resistant Sunbrella fabric by Andrew Grossman Upholstery. The Flokati rug was picked up at a thrift store in Florida. Hanging on the wall behind Dolce is a piece of art by British painter Tom Hammick.
  • 
  The kitchen before renovation.
    The kitchen before renovation.
  • 
  This sleek kitchen in the renovated Dolce and Burnham Residence hits warm notes with red lacquered cabinetry, cypress woodwork, and a leafy backyard vista.
    This sleek kitchen in the renovated Dolce and Burnham Residence hits warm notes with red lacquered cabinetry, cypress woodwork, and a leafy backyard vista.
  • 
  Harry Bates designed this simple cedar house for a young family in New York in 1967. Forty years later he updated the place for its new owners, Joe Dolce and Jonathan Burnham. The addition of bright red cabinetry in the kitchen introduces a contemporary style without losing the rustic, vintage quality of the space. Read the full article here.
    Harry Bates designed this simple cedar house for a young family in New York in 1967. Forty years later he updated the place for its new owners, Joe Dolce and Jonathan Burnham. The addition of bright red cabinetry in the kitchen introduces a contemporary style without losing the rustic, vintage quality of the space. Read the full article here.
  • 
  A shot of the former spiral staircase.
    A shot of the former spiral staircase.
  • 
  Dolce sits at the dining-room table in front of the elegantly slatted cypress divider, which separates the living space from the new staircase.
    Dolce sits at the dining-room table in front of the elegantly slatted cypress divider, which separates the living space from the new staircase.
  • 
  The office space is situated above the loft and is illuminated by Jielde steel lamps from France, which Dolce collects.
    The office space is situated above the loft and is illuminated by Jielde steel lamps from France, which Dolce collects.
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  A guest bedroom is furnished in a quaintly quirky fashion.
    A guest bedroom is furnished in a quaintly quirky fashion.
  • 
  Burnham and Dolce picked up a petite but deep bathtub, which fits perfectly in the modest master bathroom upstairs.
    Burnham and Dolce picked up a petite but deep bathtub, which fits perfectly in the modest master bathroom upstairs.
  • 
  The exterior, shown in a 1970 photograph.
    The exterior, shown in a 1970 photograph.
  • 
  The patio is also equipped with a generous workspace. Bates’s original fenestration, which failed to meet current building code, has been brought up to safety standards by employing the same slatting motif used elsewhere in the house.
    The patio is also equipped with a generous workspace. Bates’s original fenestration, which failed to meet current building code, has been brought up to safety standards by employing the same slatting motif used elsewhere in the house.
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