Live/Work: Modern Art Gallery and Home in Antwerp

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January 23, 2013
Both a gallery and a residence, an Antwerp home redefines the boundaries between public and private, art and interior design. Read Full Article
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  With the help of architect Bart Lens, Veerle Wenes and Bob Christiaens merged a 19th-century building with a 1970s one to create a combined home and art gallery in Antwerp. In the dining room downstairs, Wenes entertains family, friends, and gallery visitors. The yellow chair is by Jens Fager.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    With the help of architect Bart Lens, Veerle Wenes and Bob Christiaens merged a 19th-century building with a 1970s one to create a combined home and art gallery in Antwerp. In the dining room downstairs, Wenes entertains family, friends, and gallery visitors. The yellow chair is by Jens Fager.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Images by Raw Color hang in a room upstairs.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Images by Raw Color hang in a room upstairs.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Wenes incorporated artful furnishings into the private spaces: In the living room, a leather chair by Maarten Van Severen is beneath a lamp by his son, Hannes Van Severen, of design duo Muller Van Severen.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Wenes incorporated artful furnishings into the private spaces: In the living room, a leather chair by Maarten Van Severen is beneath a lamp by his son, Hannes Van Severen, of design duo Muller Van Severen.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  The room also contains a sofa by Flexform, cushions from textile firm Chevalier Masson, a Jens Fager candelabra, and a painting by Roger Raveel.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    The room also contains a sofa by Flexform, cushions from textile firm Chevalier Masson, a Jens Fager candelabra, and a painting by Roger Raveel.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  An installation by Willem Cole hangs in the gallery, which leads to an open stairway to the office and private bedrooms upstairs.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    An installation by Willem Cole hangs in the gallery, which leads to an open stairway to the office and private bedrooms upstairs.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Wenes and Lens conceptualized a gradation of white to gray hues for the walls of the 1,500-square-foot gallery into the 4,000-square-foot home, culminating in a deep gray for the master bedroom. The room is reserved for meaningful pieces from the couple’s collection, such as a figure they found at a market in Beijing and lamps by artists Wenes represents.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Wenes and Lens conceptualized a gradation of white to gray hues for the walls of the 1,500-square-foot gallery into the 4,000-square-foot home, culminating in a deep gray for the master bedroom. The room is reserved for meaningful pieces from the couple’s collection, such as a figure they found at a market in Beijing and lamps by artists Wenes represents.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  The main rooms include an art nook.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    The main rooms include an art nook.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  An installation by d’Hanis & Lachaert.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    An installation by d’Hanis & Lachaert.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  A bookshelf by Muller Van Severen.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    A bookshelf by Muller Van Severen.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution for the bathroom. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.”  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution for the bathroom. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.”

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Three afternoons a week, Wenes opens the gallery and “my private space belongs to the public,” she says. On the box is a piece by Tamara Van San.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Three afternoons a week, Wenes opens the gallery and “my private space belongs to the public,” she says. On the box is a piece by Tamara Van San.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Wenes chose to keep the original brick floors to tie the older building to its past.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Wenes chose to keep the original brick floors to tie the older building to its past.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  The kitchen, which the architect tucked into the back of the house, contains wooden cutting boards by Studio Simple and knives by Studio Simple and Antoine Van Loocke.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    The kitchen, which the architect tucked into the back of the house, contains wooden cutting boards by Studio Simple and knives by Studio Simple and Antoine Van Loocke.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  A workspace within Wenes's Antwerp house and gallery features splashes of color.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    A workspace within Wenes's Antwerp house and gallery features splashes of color.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  “People should choose objects for their home with passion, love, and emotion. You must give your interior some time to grow with your experiences. Let it be a combination of important discoveries from your own life.” —Resident Veerle Wenes  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    “People should choose objects for their home with passion, love, and emotion. You must give your interior some time to grow with your experiences. Let it be a combination of important discoveries from your own life.” —Resident Veerle Wenes

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  The patio outside Wenes's house and gallery.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    The patio outside Wenes's house and gallery.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  “There was too much visual pollution disturbing the simplicity. The goal was to allow the existing buildings to work within a totally new program, each still distinguishable by its own destiny.” —Architect Bart Len  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    “There was too much visual pollution disturbing the simplicity. The goal was to allow the existing buildings to work within a totally new program, each still distinguishable by its own destiny.” —Architect Bart Len

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  The floor plan.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    The floor plan.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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