Home Cooking

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July 23, 2009

For Erik and Ivana Gonzalez, the design of their kitchen—and every other room in the house—was truly a family affair.

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  Stainless steel appliances, including the Sub-Zero refrigerator, Fisher & Paykel dishwasher, and Viking oven and cooktop, are seamlessly integrated with the natural maple paneling that Erik used here and throughout the house. The marble used for the countertops is Bianco Carrara. “It’s just a very clean palette,” he explains.  Photo by: Peter Yang
    Stainless steel appliances, including the Sub-Zero refrigerator, Fisher & Paykel dishwasher, and Viking oven and cooktop, are seamlessly integrated with the natural maple paneling that Erik used here and throughout the house. The marble used for the countertops is Bianco Carrara. “It’s just a very clean palette,” he explains.

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  Because the kitchen is so open, Erik designed it in such a way that there’s room for everything from cookbooks to wine racks. Even the Viking stove hood disappears into the counter at the touch of a button. “People ask if we spend a lot of time cleaning, but that’s just not the case. There’s a place for everything.”  Photo by: Peter Yang
    Because the kitchen is so open, Erik designed it in such a way that there’s room for everything from cookbooks to wine racks. Even the Viking stove hood disappears into the counter at the touch of a button. “People ask if we spend a lot of time cleaning, but that’s just not the case. There’s a place for everything.”

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  Graphic cowhides on the guest bed, the dining chairs, and the living room floor unite the varying levels of the house. That design element—and the cute oil derrick lamp in the guest bedroom—remind you that, yes, you are in Texas. The drawings are by Erik’s brother Jair, an architect working in New York.  Photo by: Peter Yang
    Graphic cowhides on the guest bed, the dining chairs, and the living room floor unite the varying levels of the house. That design element—and the cute oil derrick lamp in the guest bedroom—remind you that, yes, you are in Texas. The drawings are by Erik’s brother Jair, an architect working in New York.

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  In the third-floor bedroom, horizontal wood-framed casement windows by Pella open out to tree-filled views of Lake Austin and Westlake Hills. Comfortably austere, the only furniture here is the bed, two nightstands, and a marble table for books and candles. Erik designed the bed, nightstands, and marble table; the paintings are by Jair.  Photo by: Peter Yang
    In the third-floor bedroom, horizontal wood-framed casement windows by Pella open out to tree-filled views of Lake Austin and Westlake Hills. Comfortably austere, the only furniture here is the bed, two nightstands, and a marble table for books and candles. Erik designed the bed, nightstands, and marble table; the paintings are by Jair.

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  Though the Quinta Ivana site was very restrictive (30 feet wide by 80 feet deep), it benefits greatly from a greenbelt area on the southern façade, which lets a tremendous amount of natural light into all three levels. Large, strategically placed glass walls further enhance that illumination, as does the restrained use of recessed lighting by Lightolier.  Photo by: Peter Yang
    Though the Quinta Ivana site was very restrictive (30 feet wide by 80 feet deep), it benefits greatly from a greenbelt area on the southern façade, which lets a tremendous amount of natural light into all three levels. Large, strategically placed glass walls further enhance that illumination, as does the restrained use of recessed lighting by Lightolier.

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  The master bath is a simple rectangle. “Like the kitchen, I designed it so that no stuff was laying around,” Erik said. The surfaces are natural and subdued; a simple palette of tones, colors, and materials unifies the space. Travertine marble was used on the floors, shower, and countertop. The closet and cabinetry are maple. Erik designed the light fixture himself because, he says, “there was nothing I could find that fit the scale of the room.” He used cold-rolled steel with exposed wires to give it an industrial feel.  Photo by: Peter Yang
    The master bath is a simple rectangle. “Like the kitchen, I designed it so that no stuff was laying around,” Erik said. The surfaces are natural and subdued; a simple palette of tones, colors, and materials unifies the space. Travertine marble was used on the floors, shower, and countertop. The closet and cabinetry are maple. Erik designed the light fixture himself because, he says, “there was nothing I could find that fit the scale of the room.” He used cold-rolled steel with exposed wires to give it an industrial feel.

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  The distinctive cowhide-and-chrome dining chairs were designed and built by Raul 30 years ago. Erik and his brother Alan, a recent graduate of the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, de-signed the glass table. “The form for it came from prefab concrete ties,” says Erik. “Everything in here fits together surprisingly well.”  Photo by: Peter Yang
    The distinctive cowhide-and-chrome dining chairs were designed and built by Raul 30 years ago. Erik and his brother Alan, a recent graduate of the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, de-signed the glass table. “The form for it came from prefab concrete ties,” says Erik. “Everything in here fits together surprisingly well.”

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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  The curvy, off-white sofa, which forms a perfect conversation pit, was purchased on Ebay (and cost as much as it did to buy).  Photo by: Peter Yang
    The curvy, off-white sofa, which forms a perfect conversation pit, was purchased on Ebay (and cost as much as it did to buy).

    Photo by: Peter Yang

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