Hillside Family Home in Australia

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February 28, 2009
An unvisited ocean-facing plot of land, a couple of architect neighbors, and one giant leap of faith have netted a pair of erstwhile Londoners a dream home of their own in northeast Australia. Read Full Article
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  The Tinbeerwah house and studio keep a low profile among the site’s eucalyptus trees.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    The Tinbeerwah house and studio keep a low profile among the site’s eucalyptus trees.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  A large deck off the living room overlooks the hills of Noosa and the Pacific Ocean.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    A large deck off the living room overlooks the hills of Noosa and the Pacific Ocean.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  Stefan Dunlop and Adrienne Webb repose on their front entrance stairs with their sons Keanu and Kobe.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    Stefan Dunlop and Adrienne Webb repose on their front entrance stairs with their sons Keanu and Kobe.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  The open-plan living room was inspired by the couple’s previous residence, a London loft. The paintings are by Dunlop. The louvered floor-to-ceiling windows, ceiling fan, and sliding deck doors usher in sea breezes and encourage good air circulation.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    The open-plan living room was inspired by the couple’s previous residence, a London loft. The paintings are by Dunlop. The louvered floor-to-ceiling windows, ceiling fan, and sliding deck doors usher in sea breezes and encourage good air circulation.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  Most of the furniture in the living room is from London flea markets and eBay.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    Most of the furniture in the living room is from London flea markets and eBay.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  In his detached painting studio, Dunlop considers a work in progress. The building is oriented east-west to avoid direct sunlight, and the long, narrow shape enables the artist to get some distance from his paintings as he works. An oversize front door and angled ceiling accommodate extra-large canvases; the plywood walls and floor can 
ably endure a beating, or, as is more likely, stray splashes of paint.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    In his detached painting studio, Dunlop considers a work in progress. The building is oriented east-west to avoid direct sunlight, and the long, narrow shape enables the artist to get some distance from his paintings as he works. An oversize front door and angled ceiling accommodate extra-large canvases; the plywood walls and floor can ably endure a beating, or, as is more likely, stray splashes of paint.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  The studio is clad in corrugated tin, echoing the adjacent water-storage tanks, which collect and filter rainwater off the roof.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    The studio is clad in corrugated tin, echoing the adjacent water-storage tanks, which collect and filter rainwater off the roof.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  The outdoor storage area is a nod to traditional Queensland architecture.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    The outdoor storage area is a nod to traditional Queensland architecture.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  The serene all-white bathroom can be sealed off from the master bedroom by two sliding doors, or left open for a loftlike feel.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    The serene all-white bathroom can be sealed off from the master bedroom by two sliding doors, or left open for a loftlike feel.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  Webb surveys the view from the “lookout deck” off the bedroom.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    Webb surveys the view from the “lookout deck” off the bedroom.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  Batten screens of spotted gum wood sheath the house and allow ventilation into the outdoor storage area.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    Batten screens of spotted gum wood sheath the house and allow ventilation into the outdoor storage area.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor.  Photo by: Richard Powers
    Dunlop demonstrates the deck’s secondary use: as a launching pad into the concrete plunge pool on the first floor.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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