Hideyuki Nakayama's '2004' House

written by:
August 22, 2011

Our September Japan Style issue celebrates design influenced or inpired by Japanese culture. In conjunction with the issue, guest writer Cathelijne Nuijsink will be covering residential projects by the core of young architects presently working in Japan. Week 3: Hideyuki Nakayama.

 

When Hideyuki Nakayama first sits down to dream up a design, he takes a pencil to paper and starts sketching. With a single line, a blank sheet of paper becomes a spacious floor. He adds another line, erases a dash here and there and the space transforms in the blink of an eye. For "2004," a private residence amid a new residential development in Matsumoto, Japan, Nakayama started off with sketches of a girl sleeping on a blanket with a floor hovering above her. What began as an exercise in exploring spatial relationships through rudimentary sketches spiraled into a home that breaks with convention. Here, we take a look at this delightfully unconventional project.

  • 
  The distance between site and structure is more dramatic in the evening when light shines through the sunken glass living room.
    The distance between site and structure is more dramatic in the evening when light shines through the sunken glass living room.
  • 
  The home is about the same height as a typical two-story residence. The exterior reveals almost nothing about the unusual section.
    The home is about the same height as a typical two-story residence. The exterior reveals almost nothing about the unusual section.
  • 
  Each of Nakayama's designs begins as a simple sketch. Here is one of the initial drawings for the interior scheme. Nakayama first drew a rectangular slab intended to be the floor. He then added a glass and chair, making the "floor" a table.
    Each of Nakayama's designs begins as a simple sketch. Here is one of the initial drawings for the interior scheme. Nakayama first drew a rectangular slab intended to be the floor. He then added a glass and chair, making the "floor" a table.
  • 
  Here, a girl views a field of clover through a window. If one were to sit on the ground floor, Nakayama explains, he or she would be able to see each clover leaf, just as if they were outdoors.
    Here, a girl views a field of clover through a window. If one were to sit on the ground floor, Nakayama explains, he or she would be able to see each clover leaf, just as if they were outdoors.
  • 
  "Gazing down from the main living floor, the site seems like a museum specimen stored in a glass box," says Nakayama.
    "Gazing down from the main living floor, the site seems like a museum specimen stored in a glass box," says Nakayama.
  • 
  Nakayama distanced the entire house from the site, which is overgrown with emerald green clover. A slim glass band snakes around the perimeter, separating the structure from earth.
    Nakayama distanced the entire house from the site, which is overgrown with emerald green clover. A slim glass band snakes around the perimeter, separating the structure from earth.
  • 
  This image best illustrates the ambiguous spatial relationships in the home. The black slab acts as a mezzanine as well as a place to eat and gather.
    This image best illustrates the ambiguous spatial relationships in the home. The black slab acts as a mezzanine as well as a place to eat and gather.
  • 
  Here's a view of the sunken living room/play space.
    Here's a view of the sunken living room/play space.
  • 
  Furniture and goods placed on top of the table turn it into a floor slab hovering between the living floor and upper floor.
    Furniture and goods placed on top of the table turn it into a floor slab hovering between the living floor and upper floor.
  • 
  Here's a view from the second floor, which is accessed via a ladder from the charcoal gray mezzanine.
    Here's a view from the second floor, which is accessed via a ladder from the charcoal gray mezzanine.
  • 
  Here are the plans and sections of the residence.
    Here are the plans and sections of the residence.

@current / @total

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...