Go With the Flow

written by:
photos by:
April 28, 2009

Along the ever-expanding coastline of Hawaii’s Big Island, an architect and his family exchange fast-paced city life for a different kind of flow—the geological kind.

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  It’s mid-morning on the lanai. Cathy reads a Dr. Seuss book to Zane while Craig chats with a client about a project he’s working on back in San Francisco.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    It’s mid-morning on the lanai. Cathy reads a Dr. Seuss book to Zane while Craig chats with a client about a project he’s working on back in San Francisco.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  "Concrete guru” Mike Lynch helped pour the foundation into the a’a lava. The steel frame was erected by Richard Jones, who usually works on big-box stores in Honolulu.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    "Concrete guru” Mike Lynch helped pour the foundation into the a’a lava. The steel frame was erected by Richard Jones, who usually works on big-box stores in Honolulu.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  The lava rock used for the steps was cut on a giant saw near Hilo. Craig finished assembling the staircase just in time for Zane’s one-year baby luau.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    The lava rock used for the steps was cut on a giant saw near Hilo. Craig finished assembling the staircase just in time for Zane’s one-year baby luau.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  The X-shaped support in the steel frame acts exactly like the smaller version you might find on a bookshelf—helping maintain the frame’s rigidity and tensile strength. Cathy models a vintage Thai muumuu.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    The X-shaped support in the steel frame acts exactly like the smaller version you might find on a bookshelf—helping maintain the frame’s rigidity and tensile strength. Cathy models a vintage Thai muumuu.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  The screen around the lanai is made from extrene, a material used by the military for radio towers. The welded-steel sculpture, set atop a pile of a’a rocks, was made by Craig.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    The screen around the lanai is made from extrene, a material used by the military for radio towers. The welded-steel sculpture, set atop a pile of a’a rocks, was made by Craig.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  When Cathy and Craig bought the land, it was completely bare. With plenty of sun and rain, these palms have grown a lot in the last two years.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    When Cathy and Craig bought the land, it was completely bare. With plenty of sun and rain, these palms have grown a lot in the last two years.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  The tub room sits at the end of the hallway leading to the bedroom, and serves as a visual centerpiece from almost every area of the home. The steel frame bisects the opening for the six-foot-wide skylight.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    The tub room sits at the end of the hallway leading to the bedroom, and serves as a visual centerpiece from almost every area of the home. The steel frame bisects the opening for the six-foot-wide skylight.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  Eddy Uritani (or Uncle Eddy, as he’s known to Zane) did all the tile work in the kitchen and bathroom. The tiles come from a Canadian company called Interstyle.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    Eddy Uritani (or Uncle Eddy, as he’s known to Zane) did all the tile work in the kitchen and bathroom. The tiles come from a Canadian company called Interstyle.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  The concrete floor takes on a silky appearance in the kitchen and dining areas. The Gideå table is from IKEA, the Karim Rashid Oh chairs are from Umbra, and the Erik Magnussen kerosene Ship’s lamp is by Stelton.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    The concrete floor takes on a silky appearance in the kitchen and dining areas. The Gideå table is from IKEA, the Karim Rashid Oh chairs are from Umbra, and the Erik Magnussen kerosene Ship’s lamp is by Stelton.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  A small room divider offers a place to hang Cathy’s painting Pelevision, which was inspired by her first trip to the island.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    A small room divider offers a place to hang Cathy’s painting Pelevision, which was inspired by her first trip to the island.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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  A vintage suspended wall unit serves as a home office. Cathy demonstrates the “third bedroom”—a three-person hammock from Oaxaca.  Photo by: Linny Morris

    A vintage suspended wall unit serves as a home office. Cathy demonstrates the “third bedroom”—a three-person hammock from Oaxaca.

    Photo by: Linny Morris

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