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Farmhouse Redux

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Two years ago architect Chad Everhart came across an old farmhouse near Boone, North Carolina. He could tell it dated back to the Great Depression by the 1930s-era cardboard—once used as insulation—that he found stuffed down between its tongue-and-groove walls.

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  Red and yellow accent colors blend with natural North Carolina foliage. Cantilevered porches and decks provide deep shadows. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    Red and yellow accent colors blend with natural North Carolina foliage. Cantilevered porches and decks provide deep shadows. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The original Depression-era “box frame” farmhouse was constructed without studs, using only one-inch-by-ten-inch planks. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The original Depression-era “box frame” farmhouse was constructed without studs, using only one-inch-by-ten-inch planks. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The first floor plan for “Farmhouse Redux” adds two porches and two “bump-outs,” or saddlebags, for additional interior space. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The first floor plan for “Farmhouse Redux” adds two porches and two “bump-outs,” or saddlebags, for additional interior space. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  Inside the main living area, tongue-and-grooved white pine covers the walls and vaulted ceilings, and a red closet door, built of salvaged pine from the original house, slides along barn-track hardware. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    Inside the main living area, tongue-and-grooved white pine covers the walls and vaulted ceilings, and a red closet door, built of salvaged pine from the original house, slides along barn-track hardware. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The kitchen, totaling an affordable $5,000 for all fixtures, refrigerator, stove, etc., came from Ikea. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The kitchen, totaling an affordable $5,000 for all fixtures, refrigerator, stove, etc., came from Ikea. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The vanity in the bath is housed in what Chad calls a “bump-out” or a saddlebag, a feature that expands interior space by a few feet on either side of the farmhouse. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The vanity in the bath is housed in what Chad calls a “bump-out” or a saddlebag, a feature that expands interior space by a few feet on either side of the farmhouse. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  An off-the-shelf post-and-beam system is used as foundation for the porches.  Welded wire mesh is used for the guardrail. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    An off-the-shelf post-and-beam system is used as foundation for the porches. Welded wire mesh is used for the guardrail. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The ceiling was dropped over the dining room to provide a more intimate setting. Strips of salvaged hemlock and chestnut wrap the interior wall and ceiling. A loft for naps and overnight guests is above. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The ceiling was dropped over the dining room to provide a more intimate setting. Strips of salvaged hemlock and chestnut wrap the interior wall and ceiling. A loft for naps and overnight guests is above. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  Exterior materials include Galvalume metal roofing/siding, local white-pine lap siding, Hardie panel siding, and an original concrete block foundation. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    Exterior materials include Galvalume metal roofing/siding, local white-pine lap siding, Hardie panel siding, and an original concrete block foundation. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The red barn door on a sliding track door is an icon, built from salvaged pine from the original farmhouse. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The red barn door on a sliding track door is an icon, built from salvaged pine from the original farmhouse. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The Everharts added two porches to the form of the original farmhouse. This one is for dining. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The Everharts added two porches to the form of the original farmhouse. This one is for dining. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The corner window in the bedroom frames the view of one of three creeks and streams surrounding the two-and-a-half-acre site. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The corner window in the bedroom frames the view of one of three creeks and streams surrounding the two-and-a-half-acre site. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
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  The new home’s porches glow like lanterns at night. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.
    The new home’s porches glow like lanterns at night. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.

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