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A Family Home in Israel

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Located in Ramat-Hasharon, a suburb of Tel Aviv in Israel, this 2,100-square-foot house was designed by Keren Milchberg Porat for a family of six—a cinematographer and art director and their four children, ranging in age from one to 17 years old. Porat, who heads up the architecture firm Studio ID253, used a slew of recycled and raw materials, strategically located openings to maximize ventilation and natural light, and "circular passages" to create an open and flexible family home that works equally well for entertaining large groups of people—something the family loves to do.

‎‏Originally the owners were inspired by prefab techniques and concepts. But "due to the fact that they couldn't find any local Israeli contractor with validated prefab experience, and their budget was too tight to simply fly in a crew from the states or Europe, they decided to go the only way they could—with conventional and traditional building methods popular in Israel," says Porat. "But certain prefab-inspired design elements remained, such as cement floors, industrial roofing, extensive use of large windows, and large deck areas that surround the interior of the house."

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  In the center of the open space, a wood-clad iron cube rises 13.12 feet high. The wood was purchased from a crane company that unloads wood containers at the port. The cube contains the main systems and functions of the house. On the lower level is a bathroom, pantry, laundry room, and coat closet.  Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein
    In the center of the open space, a wood-clad iron cube rises 13.12 feet high. The wood was purchased from a crane company that unloads wood containers at the port. The cube contains the main systems and functions of the house. On the lower level is a bathroom, pantry, laundry room, and coat closet.

    Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein

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  One wall of the living room houses a library.  Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein
    One wall of the living room houses a library.

    Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein

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  The view of the main living space from the upper part of the central cube (the gallery level).  Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein
    The view of the main living space from the upper part of the central cube (the gallery level).

    Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein

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  A closer look at the reclaimed wood cladding the central cube and staircase.  Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein
    A closer look at the reclaimed wood cladding the central cube and staircase.

    Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein

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  The master bath is a clean and spare space, a mixture of white and concrete.  Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein
    The master bath is a clean and spare space, a mixture of white and concrete.

    Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein

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  A closer look at the cast-in-place concrete counter in the master bathroom.
    A closer look at the cast-in-place concrete counter in the master bathroom.
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  There's a study on the gallery level, secreted atop the cube. A bridge connects the study to an additional bedroom.  Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein
    There's a study on the gallery level, secreted atop the cube. A bridge connects the study to an additional bedroom.

    Courtesy of: Copyright:Tobias Hochstein

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  A spacious deck extends off the back of the house.
    A spacious deck extends off the back of the house.
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  One of the challenges of the project was to create the impression that the house (which is semi-detached) is fully detached. This was achieved through a system of two roofs, one of which is lower, separating the central unit of the house. Additionally, the mandatory anti-bomb shelter was lined with wood and located as a "spacer" between this house and its semi-detached neighbor. The black door in the top left image is the front door of the house.
    One of the challenges of the project was to create the impression that the house (which is semi-detached) is fully detached. This was achieved through a system of two roofs, one of which is lower, separating the central unit of the house. Additionally, the mandatory anti-bomb shelter was lined with wood and located as a "spacer" between this house and its semi-detached neighbor. The black door in the top left image is the front door of the house.
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  Detail of the sliding door (in the central cube) between the passage and the laundry area and food storage.
    Detail of the sliding door (in the central cube) between the passage and the laundry area and food storage.
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  The concrete wall in the master bedroom serves as a raw, textural headboard.
    The concrete wall in the master bedroom serves as a raw, textural headboard.
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  Here's the plan of the Ramat-Hasharon House, designed by Studio ID253.
    Here's the plan of the Ramat-Hasharon House, designed by Studio ID253.
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  A section view.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    A section view.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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