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European Union: 10 Belgian Homes

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Is Belgium the new Netherlands? The design scenes of Antwerp, Ghent, Brussels, and Bruges are certainly heating up, and we love the houses we've seen for their playful mix of clean lines, color, and whimsy. Here are ten great examples.
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  Architect Tom Verschueren, of Mechelen, Belgium-based DMVA, used a classic Belgian material, brick, in an irreverent way in order to create maximum privacy but also maximum light for his clients. A closed street-side facade with an open backside facing the garden is totally glazed from the ground up to the saddleback roof. On the street side, the only true opening is the door; the seven tall, slim windows are screened by what Verschueren calls “knitted” bricks. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.  Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    Architect Tom Verschueren, of Mechelen, Belgium-based DMVA, used a classic Belgian material, brick, in an irreverent way in order to create maximum privacy but also maximum light for his clients. A closed street-side facade with an open backside facing the garden is totally glazed from the ground up to the saddleback roof. On the street side, the only true opening is the door; the seven tall, slim windows are screened by what Verschueren calls “knitted” bricks. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

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  Perhaps no Belgian home is more cutting-edge than that of Veerle Wenes, who also runs the design gallery Valerie Traan in the same space. For the bathroom, Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.” Photo by Tim Van de Velde.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Perhaps no Belgian home is more cutting-edge than that of Veerle Wenes, who also runs the design gallery Valerie Traan in the same space. For the bathroom, Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.” Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Belgian architect Dieter Van Everbroeck's modern home outside of Ghent all started with a tree. He bought the property after falling love with a 300-year-old elm beech tree, then renovated the existing bungalow to take full advantage of the view. Two glass facades in the living space allow for unencumbered ogling. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

    Belgian architect Dieter Van Everbroeck's modern home outside of Ghent all started with a tree. He bought the property after falling love with a 300-year-old elm beech tree, then renovated the existing bungalow to take full advantage of the view. Two glass facades in the living space allow for unencumbered ogling. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  Globetrotting Belgian architect Julien De Smedt carves out a space to call his own in a converted industrial loft building in Brussels. "On clear nights, I’ll head upstairs," says De Smedt. "There’s a skylight and you can see the stars. Even in the city, you totally can! The skylight really changes the condition of the interior. If you light that gap in the evening from the outside, it’s as if there is daylight." Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.  Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    Globetrotting Belgian architect Julien De Smedt carves out a space to call his own in a converted industrial loft building in Brussels. "On clear nights, I’ll head upstairs," says De Smedt. "There’s a skylight and you can see the stars. Even in the city, you totally can! The skylight really changes the condition of the interior. If you light that gap in the evening from the outside, it’s as if there is daylight." Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

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  A pair of interior architects with a years-in-the-making furniture collection recast an old Belgian factory—in Bellem, a 25-minute drive out of Ghent and halfway to Bruges—as a playful family home. The stars of the living room are a pair of pink Bird chairs by Harry Bertoia for Knoll, accented by a brass-and-steel coffee table designed by homeowners as well as vintage marble-topped and wood occasional tables and antique rugs are from Morocco. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

    A pair of interior architects with a years-in-the-making furniture collection recast an old Belgian factory—in Bellem, a 25-minute drive out of Ghent and halfway to Bruges—as a playful family home. The stars of the living room are a pair of pink Bird chairs by Harry Bertoia for Knoll, accented by a brass-and-steel coffee table designed by homeowners as well as vintage marble-topped and wood occasional tables and antique rugs are from Morocco. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

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  Adding 290 square feet to this already small (just 566 square feet) black A-frame in Brecht, Belgium, was all the local building ordinances allowed, but the architects at dmvA found that a single wing extended out to the side gave resident Rini van Beek all the storage and living space that she needs. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.  Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    Adding 290 square feet to this already small (just 566 square feet) black A-frame in Brecht, Belgium, was all the local building ordinances allowed, but the architects at dmvA found that a single wing extended out to the side gave resident Rini van Beek all the storage and living space that she needs. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

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  At another gallery/residence in Belgium, this time in a neoclassical Brussels mansion, two design-savvy curators have arranged their dream home... Only it's all for sale. In the living room, the residents commissioned the overhead light from designers Sylvain Willenz and Hubert Verstraeten. The rug is a Moroccan patchwork from the 1960s; the teak-and-leather Kilin chair is by Sergio Rodrigues; and the cane-backed sofa is a student daybed designed by Hans Wegner for Getama in the 1950s. Photo by Chris Tubbs.   Photo by: Chris Tubbs

    At another gallery/residence in Belgium, this time in a neoclassical Brussels mansion, two design-savvy curators have arranged their dream home... Only it's all for sale. In the living room, the residents commissioned the overhead light from designers Sylvain Willenz and Hubert Verstraeten. The rug is a Moroccan patchwork from the 1960s; the teak-and-leather Kilin chair is by Sergio Rodrigues; and the cane-backed sofa is a student daybed designed by Hans Wegner for Getama in the 1950s. Photo by Chris Tubbs.

     

    Photo by: Chris Tubbs

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  At home, Brussels-based furniture designer Christiane Högner still uses the prototype for her colorful All for One shelves to file papers and magazines. Photo by Céline Clanet.  Photo by: Céline Clanet

    At home, Brussels-based furniture designer Christiane Högner still uses the prototype for her colorful All for One shelves to file papers and magazines. Photo by Céline Clanet.

    Photo by: Céline Clanet

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  Design firm Baumraum’s modern tree house in Belgium sparks a dialogue about nature and architecture. This 450-square-foot retreat, nestled between the limbs of pine and oak trees in northeastern Belgium. As a part of their green mission, the city of Hechtel-Eksel, the Flemish Forest and Nature Agency, paper company Sappi, and communications firm Proximity BBDO commissioned the structure clad in zinc and larch as a place for businesses to host sustainability oriented conferences.

    Design firm Baumraum’s modern tree house in Belgium sparks a dialogue about nature and architecture. This 450-square-foot retreat, nestled between the limbs of pine and oak trees in northeastern Belgium. As a part of their green mission, the city of Hechtel-Eksel, the Flemish Forest and Nature Agency, paper company Sappi, and communications firm Proximity BBDO commissioned the structure clad in zinc and larch as a place for businesses to host sustainability oriented conferences.

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  Dwell first discovered Labt at Maison & Objet 2012 and featured their modular Trolley Filing cabinet in our May 2012 issue. Here's a shot of the group's Ghent studio filled with their different product lines. Photo by Filip Dujardin.

    Dwell first discovered Labt at Maison & Objet 2012 and featured their modular Trolley Filing cabinet in our May 2012 issue. Here's a shot of the group's Ghent studio filled with their different product lines. Photo by Filip Dujardin.

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