Creative Renovation in Brooklyn

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July 29, 2009

When graphic designers Jeanette and Mike Abbink left behind their loft in San Francisco—with collected ephemera, a voluminous library, and a parcel of paintings in tow—they didn’t know where they would land in the Big Apple. One renovation and one Welsh terrier later, they’re back on track in Brooklyn.

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  Jeanette and Mike Abbink’s 1925 apartment building is a block from Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, where their Welsh terrier, Stig, and his Boston terrier pal, Meow, are regulars.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Jeanette and Mike Abbink’s 1925 apartment building is a block from Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, where their Welsh terrier, Stig, and his Boston terrier pal, Meow, are regulars.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Up on the ninth floor, their sober Neo sofa and chaise from DWR and classic Florence Knoll credenza are contrasted by more exotic accessories like Patrick Townsend’s Orbit chandelier and an offbeat white vase from Creative Growth, an Oakland, California, workshop for disabled artists.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Up on the ninth floor, their sober Neo sofa and chaise from DWR and classic Florence Knoll credenza are contrasted by more exotic accessories like Patrick Townsend’s Orbit chandelier and an offbeat white vase from Creative Growth, an Oakland, California, workshop for disabled artists.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A second bedroom was converted into a home office/dining room. A Dieter Rams 606 Universal Shelving System lines the wall. Perhaps the most eye-catching item 
in the room is the light fixture that hangs over their Swedish dining table. Patrick Townsend, the Queens-based designer of the Orbit chandelier, likens his wiry creation to a suspension bridge, but it looks suspiciously like a giant eggbeater.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    A second bedroom was converted into a home office/dining room. A Dieter Rams 606 Universal Shelving System lines the wall. Perhaps the most eye-catching item in the room is the light fixture that hangs over their Swedish dining table. Patrick Townsend, the Queens-based designer of the Orbit chandelier, likens his wiry creation to a suspension bridge, but it looks suspiciously like a giant eggbeater.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  In the home office/dining room, the “Ziggy Diamond” wallpaper (behind the surreal Erle Loran painting) comes from Flavor Paper, a New Orleans firm that prints wall coverings to order, and the ingenious folding table is by Swedish designer Bruno Matthson.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    In the home office/dining room, the “Ziggy Diamond” wallpaper (behind the surreal Erle Loran painting) comes from Flavor Paper, a New Orleans firm that prints wall coverings to order, and the ingenious folding table is by Swedish designer Bruno Matthson.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The Abbinks’ apartment is a study in details, from the stainless steel kitchen countertop to the clever Arclinea rail system that holds their salt and pepper.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The Abbinks’ apartment is a study in details, from the stainless steel kitchen countertop to the clever Arclinea rail system that holds their salt and pepper.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The Skinny coffee table (perfect for unauthorized doggy dining) by Prospero Rasulo for Zanotta is also a display board for Jeanette’s growing collection of Stig Lindberg and Bjorn Wiinblad ceramics.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The Skinny coffee table (perfect for unauthorized doggy dining) by Prospero Rasulo for Zanotta is also a display board for Jeanette’s growing collection of Stig Lindberg and Bjorn Wiinblad ceramics.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A narrow hallway, typical of prewar apartments, doubles as an art gallery lined with woodcut type studies by graphic artist Jack Stauffacher, type sketches by Erik Spiekermann, and photography by Catherine Opie and Catherine Ledner.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    A narrow hallway, typical of prewar apartments, doubles as an art gallery lined with woodcut type studies by graphic artist Jack Stauffacher, type sketches by Erik Spiekermann, and photography by Catherine Opie and Catherine Ledner.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  In the bedroom Aalto stools stand in for night tables next to the Legnoletto bed by Alfredo Häberli for Alias.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    In the bedroom Aalto stools stand in for night tables next to the Legnoletto bed by Alfredo Häberli for Alias.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The kitchen is a miracle of efficiency, with Antonio Citterio’s Convivium system for Arclinea shoehorned into a tight galley layout. The built-in Miele oven has storage above, and the Sub-Zero drawers are far less bulky than a freestanding refrigerator. The Carrara marble countertop and backsplash were custom cut by Brooklyn’s Acme Marble Co.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The kitchen is a miracle of efficiency, with Antonio Citterio’s Convivium system for Arclinea shoehorned into a tight galley layout. The built-in Miele oven has storage above, and the Sub-Zero drawers are far less bulky than a freestanding refrigerator. The Carrara marble countertop and backsplash were custom cut by Brooklyn’s Acme Marble Co.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Pulver and Mike worked together to devise a combination radiator cover and storage system that runs below the windows, from room to room, throughout the apartment. The screen has a slotted pattern, which Mike and Pulver painstakingly drafted—“We looked at 30 different variations,” Pulver recalls—and Pulver CNC milled into wood panels.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Pulver and Mike worked together to devise a combination radiator cover and storage system that runs below the windows, from room to room, throughout the apartment. The screen has a slotted pattern, which Mike and Pulver painstakingly drafted—“We looked at 30 different variations,” Pulver recalls—and Pulver CNC milled into wood panels.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Brooklyn–based graphic designers Jeanette and Mike Abbink worked with Architecture + Construction to renovate their residence. In the bathroom, the gray Carrara walls are offset by bright tulip-patterned wallpaper, circa 1970, from Secondhand Rose in Tribeca. The toilet is a Philippe Starck “jet action” model from Duravit. Read the entire article here.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Brooklyn–based graphic designers Jeanette and Mike Abbink worked with Architecture + Construction to renovate their residence. In the bathroom, the gray Carrara walls are offset by bright tulip-patterned wallpaper, circa 1970, from Secondhand Rose in Tribeca. The toilet is a Philippe Starck “jet action” model from Duravit. Read the entire article here.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  “The initial idea was that everything was carved Carrara,” Pulver explains. Sort of like a Roman bath. “Everything would be big, chunky, simple volumes.” Ultimately they had to buy, not carve, a sink, a tub, and a toilet.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    “The initial idea was that everything was carved Carrara,” Pulver explains. Sort of like a Roman bath. “Everything would be big, chunky, simple volumes.” Ultimately they had to buy, not carve, a sink, a tub, and a toilet.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Beneath the windows in the living room and the bedroom is the clever built-in radiator screen/storage system designed by Joshua Pulver and Mike. The bedroom dresser is vintage Russel Wright.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Beneath the windows in the living room and the bedroom is the clever built-in radiator screen/storage system designed by Joshua Pulver and Mike. The bedroom dresser is vintage Russel Wright.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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