Country Bunker

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March 29, 2013
On Austin’s outskirts, where urban, industrial, and rural collide, lawyer and science-fiction author Chris Brown’s bunker-style home redefines modern city living. Read Full Article
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  Edgeland House, built on a cliff-top lot in Austin by architect Thomas Bercy for lawyer and writer Chris Brown, is topped by a living roof to help it blend into the landscape. The concrete, steel, and glass house is divided into two distinct public and private halves.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    Edgeland House, built on a cliff-top lot in Austin by architect Thomas Bercy for lawyer and writer Chris Brown, is topped by a living roof to help it blend into the landscape. The concrete, steel, and glass house is divided into two distinct public and private halves.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  The land is adjacent to the Colorado River, along which Brown and his girlfriend, Agustina Rodriguez, walk their dogs.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    The land is adjacent to the Colorado River, along which Brown and his girlfriend, Agustina Rodriguez, walk their dogs.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  Rodriguez, a designer and architect who runs the studio Agi Miagi, created the pendant lamp and terrariums in the dining area. The space is open to the living area, where Brown’s son, Hugo, sits on a Living Divani sofa. The countertop-table is by Bercy Chen Studio.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    Rodriguez, a designer and architect who runs the studio Agi Miagi, created the pendant lamp and terrariums in the dining area. The space is open to the living area, where Brown’s son, Hugo, sits on a Living Divani sofa. The countertop-table is by Bercy Chen Studio.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  Ryan Anderson of RAD Furniture designed the stools as well as the table and benches on the pool deck.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    Ryan Anderson of RAD Furniture designed the stools as well as the table and benches on the pool deck.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  Brown and his dog Katsu head to the river; the path was once a dumping ground on top of a long-defunct underground oil pipeline. The land required a complicated excavation process, offering an opportunity for Bercy to partially bury the house. The green roof was conceptualized by John Hart Asher of the Ecosystem Design Group at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    Brown and his dog Katsu head to the river; the path was once a dumping ground on top of a long-defunct underground oil pipeline. The land required a complicated excavation process, offering an opportunity for Bercy to partially bury the house. The green roof was conceptualized by John Hart Asher of the Ecosystem Design Group at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  Like the pavilion holding the public spaces, the structure containing the bedrooms is clad in glass on the interior sides facing the courtyard, allowing a constant connection to the outside. Rodriguez (with dog Lupe) designed the steel stairs leading from the mezzanine-level home office to the master bedroom below. The stairs were fabricated by Austin-based Steel House MFG.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    Like the pavilion holding the public spaces, the structure containing the bedrooms is clad in glass on the interior sides facing the courtyard, allowing a constant connection to the outside. Rodriguez (with dog Lupe) designed the steel stairs leading from the mezzanine-level home office to the master bedroom below. The stairs were fabricated by Austin-based Steel House MFG.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  Native grasses spill forth from the green roof toward a stairway leading to the main level.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    Native grasses spill forth from the green roof toward a stairway leading to the main level.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  A Jens Risom side chair centers the living room, which looks across the courtyard to the bedroom pavilion.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    A Jens Risom side chair centers the living room, which looks across the courtyard to the bedroom pavilion.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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  The floor plan reflects the way in which the design's angles interact with the site.  Photo by: Dave Mead
    The floor plan reflects the way in which the design's angles interact with the site.

    Photo by: Dave Mead

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