Converted Loft Fit for a Modern Family in Copenhagen

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July 31, 2013
In an up-and-coming area of Copenhagen, a pair of designers and their twin girls inhabit a converted loft, filling it with serious design savvy and a hefty dose of creativity. Read Full Article
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  Morten Bo Jensen, of Danish industrial design company Vipp, and his partner, graphic designer Kristina May Olsen, have mixed repurposed vintage items with their own creations inside their Copenhagen apartment. In the kitchen, the dining table—Jensen’s first piece for Vipp—is made of a powder-coated aluminum frame with a recycled, untreated teak top. The lamps overhead are salvaged and rewired Copenhagen streetlights.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    Morten Bo Jensen, of Danish industrial design company Vipp, and his partner, graphic designer Kristina May Olsen, have mixed repurposed vintage items with their own creations inside their Copenhagen apartment. In the kitchen, the dining table—Jensen’s first piece for Vipp—is made of a powder-coated aluminum frame with a recycled, untreated teak top. The lamps overhead are salvaged and rewired Copenhagen streetlights.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  In the main living area, Olsen’s own artwork picks up on the graphic diversity of the magazines housed in Boox shelving by Jesper Holm.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    In the main living area, Olsen’s own artwork picks up on the graphic diversity of the magazines housed in Boox shelving by Jesper Holm.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  The living room features a sofa from Engell; a suspended Parentesi lamp by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzù for Flos (Olsen’s “all-time favorite”); and a wood-burning stove made by Aduro. The firewood nook set in the left wall is Jensen’s own design. Olsen is responsible for the low planters around the perimeter, which she had fabricated from poured concrete framed in welded iron, with lacquered MDF panels for doors. “Some people laughed because we’d never had plants in our apartment,” she says. “So when we wanted a hedge, our friends were, like, Ok. Really? Good luck with that.”  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    The living room features a sofa from Engell; a suspended Parentesi lamp by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzù for Flos (Olsen’s “all-time favorite”); and a wood-burning stove made by Aduro. The firewood nook set in the left wall is Jensen’s own design. Olsen is responsible for the low planters around the perimeter, which she had fabricated from poured concrete framed in welded iron, with lacquered MDF panels for doors. “Some people laughed because we’d never had plants in our apartment,” she says. “So when we wanted a hedge, our friends were, like, Ok. Really? Good luck with that.”

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  Jensen’s artwork hangs outside the family’s bathroom. It was inspired by the industrial output—Viking pencils—of the former factory space. Putting his engineering studies to work, he created the art via a meticulous process that included making precise holes and a template of “thousands” of pieces of paper. The stackable aluminum Chair_One is by 
Konstantin Grcic for Magis.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    Jensen’s artwork hangs outside the family’s bathroom. It was inspired by the industrial output—Viking pencils—of the former factory space. Putting his engineering studies to work, he created the art via a meticulous process that included making precise holes and a template of “thousands” of pieces of paper. The stackable aluminum Chair_One is by Konstantin Grcic for Magis.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  Twin daughters Merle and Anine join their parents in the family’s kitchen, designed by Jensen for Vipp. He explains that his role as chief designer at Vipp is to “work with their DNA” by refining the company’s trademark materials: stainless steel, painted metal, and rubber. For the utilitarian kitchen, “we wanted to get the feeling of a tool,” he says. “It’s nice to have a space where you can actually work.” The gas stovetop is by ABK and the refrigerator is by Smeg; Le Perroquet spotlights are from iGuzzini.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    Twin daughters Merle and Anine join their parents in the family’s kitchen, designed by Jensen for Vipp. He explains that his role as chief designer at Vipp is to “work with their DNA” by refining the company’s trademark materials: stainless steel, painted metal, and rubber. For the utilitarian kitchen, “we wanted to get the feeling of a tool,” he says. “It’s nice to have a space where you can actually work.” The gas stovetop is by ABK and the refrigerator is by Smeg; Le Perroquet spotlights are from iGuzzini.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  The main feature of twins Merle and Anine’s shared bedroom is a massive modern dollhouse, built by their dad for their second birthday.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    The main feature of twins Merle and Anine’s shared bedroom is a massive modern dollhouse, built by their dad for their second birthday.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  The family shares one main bathroom, which is outfitted with Vipp’s new line of products: 982 bath furniture, a 906 faucet, and a 992 mirror. The shower sports a Raindance Connect showerhead by Hansgrohe, and there is a wall-mounted toilet by Villeroy & Boch. The Nomad light fixture is from Modular Lighting Instruments, and the floors are topped with ceramic tiles by LaFaenza.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    The family shares one main bathroom, which is outfitted with Vipp’s new line of products: 982 bath furniture, a 906 faucet, and a 992 mirror. The shower sports a Raindance Connect showerhead by Hansgrohe, and there is a wall-mounted toilet by Villeroy & Boch. The Nomad light fixture is from Modular Lighting Instruments, and the floors are topped with ceramic tiles by LaFaenza.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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  The Viking Pencil Factory Loft's floorplan.  Photo by: Anders Hviid
    The Viking Pencil Factory Loft's floorplan.

    Photo by: Anders Hviid

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