written by:
photos by:
March 22, 2016
Originally published in The Now 99
as
Time Share
Two homes combine under one roof in this unique lakeside structure.
Communal living vacation home wooden structures

For Karina Inzunza, Graham Barker, Melana Janzen, and John McMinn (pictured left to right), a shared vacation home on Georgian Bay was the perfect opportunity to pool resources, split costs, and create an extended family unit.

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Wooden guest cabin rooms with ladder

The vacation complex is designed to promote an easy flow between the two families' spaces, which include guest cabins and a shared porch for hanging out and eating.

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Outdoor wooden activity porch

The large wraparound porch links the two main houses and two guest cabins, and is the site of many impromptu shared meals.

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outdoor wooden hanging bed

Two-year-old Annika and five-year-old Soren make music on the "nap swing," a popular hangout spot for kids and adults alike.

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Modern playroom with tall windows

McMinn, an architect, helps Soren construct a TinkerToy tower. The cowhide rug is from Perfect Leather Goods, and the Wassily Chair is by Marcel Breuer for Knoll.

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Minimalist wooden house structure with tall windows

A view of the exterior of the structure, showing the two families' separate living spaces anchored by a single broad porch.

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Outdoor wooden house structure and porch

Barker, a software executive and former professional drummer, describes the challenge of the project as such: "It’s the expression of two commingling family structures, with respect for the need for individuality at times."

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Lofty kids bedroom with wooden ceiling

As shown here, the orientation of the two houses provides both privacy and occasional moments of permeability; a peek through the window above the master bed reveals neighbors across the way.

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Indoors old-fashioned metal fire stove

The structures share a solar panel, but the families control their own home's heat level with a wood-burning stove.

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Simple kids bedroom bunk bed with ladder

Soren and Annika share a lofted bedroom and a pair of bunks. In Barker and Inzunza's house, this space is used as an office and music room.

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Urban minimalist kitchen dining room

McMinn and Janzen's kitchen opens onto a double-height living and dining area.

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Outdoor natural long wooden bench

In addition to spaces for dining and napping, the porch shelters a kayak and this hanging bench-cum-balance beam made of salvaged tree trunks.

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Outdoor wooden hallway multiple units

What else is the porch good for? Tricycle races, of course.

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Communal living vacation home floor plan

Here, a floor plan of the shared structure, called the CP Harbour House, which was designed by architects (and residents) Melana Janzen and John McMinn.

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Communal living vacation home wooden structures

For Karina Inzunza, Graham Barker, Melana Janzen, and John McMinn (pictured left to right), a shared vacation home on Georgian Bay was the perfect opportunity to pool resources, split costs, and create an extended family unit.

Project 
CP Harbour House
Architect 

Sharing a vacation home is a common arrangement. But sharing an architectural and conceptual experiment—as well as a linked basement, sprawling deck, and utility bills—takes more imagination, and that’s the idea architects Melana Janzen and John McMinn developed for their “cottage” near Toronto. Together with a couple of friends they built a complex, not quite one house and not quite two, that can accommodate both families at once under the shelter of a giant covered porch.

Outdoor wooden activity porch

The large wraparound porch links the two main houses and two guest cabins, and is the site of many impromptu shared meals.

The idea of a rustic second home was attractive to the couple, who live with their kids—five-year-old Soren and two-year-old Annika—in an apartment in downtown Toronto. McMinn’s friends Graham Barker and Karina Inzunza became their partners after Barker and Inzunza got the chance to buy a rare waterfront lot on Georgian Bay, “a community of creative people, a lot of ex-hippies and artists and poets,” says Barker. Both families wanted space to entertain, McMinn and Janzen needed a bedroom for the kids, and Barker and Inzunza needed a home office and a music room.

How to fit it all? They considered building tiny neighboring cabins, but the architects looked for a more collective solution. Tight zoning regulations meant they could only have one “house,” so McMinn and Janzen stretched the definition. Their final scheme consists of a massive shed—a post-and-beam structure of Douglas fir, 20 feet high at its apex—that shelters two separate, fully insulated structures. They’re connected underground in a linked basement, where two mechanical rooms hold water heaters and an electrical system (solar panels on the roof offset power from the grid).

outdoor wooden hanging bed

Two-year-old Annika and five-year-old Soren make music on the "nap swing," a popular hangout spot for kids and adults alike.

Aboveground, each couple has a 15-by-30-foot home with views to the outside, plus an adjoining sleeping cabin for guests. “There is an intentionality about what is separate and what is shared,” Janzen says. The expense and maintenance of the electrical systems are pooled and the outdoor spaces are common ground. Almost every day, communal lunches and dinner parties unfold on the porch, which is outfitted with swings and Japanese lanterns.

The mostly symmetrical layout of the compound, McMinn says, precludes a sense of territoriality. “The two houses and cabins have a kind of equality,” he says. That’s distinct from the typical family compound in this region and elsewhere, where small cabins usually orbit a main house. “There’s always a question,” McMinn says: “‘Are we going to have dinner on their side or on our side?’”

This comes up often, because the complex has become a year-round meeting place for the two families, who have an unusual bond: The kids call Barker and Inzunza, who is Chilean, tío and tía, and Barker says they’re “practicing for a new stage of life” as grandparents. They all come together for singalongs with guitar or mandolin, often joined by people from nearby cottages—some of whom grew up with Barker, who has summered on Georgian Bay since he was young. All four agree that an inclusive atmosphere is paramount. “Community is important to us,” Inzunza says. “Through music, through food, through entertaining, it’s important to bring people together.”

Modern playroom with tall windows

McMinn, an architect, helps Soren construct a TinkerToy tower. The cowhide rug is from Perfect Leather Goods, and the Wassily Chair is by Marcel Breuer for Knoll.

Five Tips for Designing for Community

Make it simple to maintain.
The property is partially off the grid and designed to avoid problems typical of cold climates—for example, the water lines drain into the mechanical room, which is heated all winter to keep the pipes from freezing.

Give everyone control over their space.
Although the structures share a solar panel array, the families heat their individual spaces with wood.
46. Create flexible space for entertaining and play.
A spacious wraparound deck accommodates a wide range of activities, from tricycle riding to communal sunset cocktails to naps on the bed swing.

Allow people to be together and apart.
The houses are oriented to the water but also to look away from each other. Insulation keeps noise at bay.

Food matters.
Each house has its own well-equipped kitchen and several dining areas, indoors and out, that foster an easy atmosphere of communal meals and impromptu gatherings.

 

For more photographs of the project, please view our slideshow.

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