A Closer Look: 4 Homes by Gray Organschi Architecture

written by:
March 14, 2014
Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi, founders of the New Haven, Connecticut, architecture firm Gray Organschi, specialize in thoughtful, site-specific homes. See our favorites from the Dwell archives.
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  In 2005, Suzanne and Brooks Kelley hired Gray Organschi to renovate an old cottage on their property. The resulting 1,100-square-foot glass and ipe structure suited the sloped meadow perfectly. Photo by Mark Mahaney.  Photo by: Mark Mahaney

    In 2005, Suzanne and Brooks Kelley hired Gray Organschi to renovate an old cottage on their property. The resulting 1,100-square-foot glass and ipe structure suited the sloped meadow perfectly. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

    Photo by: Mark Mahaney

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  The interiors are wrapped in FSC-Certified laminated bleached bamboo, which offers a warm glow. Photo by Mark Mahaney.  Photo by: Mark Mahaney

    The interiors are wrapped in FSC-Certified laminated bleached bamboo, which offers a warm glow. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

    Photo by: Mark Mahaney

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  Consisting of two barnlike volumes set atop a stone foundation, Gray Organschi’s own vacation home, the Depot House, offers a locally rooted vision of New England modernism. Photo by Andrea Chu.

    Consisting of two barnlike volumes set atop a stone foundation, Gray Organschi’s own vacation home, the Depot House, offers a locally rooted vision of New England modernism. Photo by Andrea Chu.

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  In the kitchen, a Sirius range hood hovers over a Wolf cooktop. The bleached ash cabinets were designed by JIG Design Build, the fabrication arm of Gray Organschi Architecture. Photo by Andrea Chu.  Photo by: Andrea Chu

    In the kitchen, a Sirius range hood hovers over a Wolf cooktop. The bleached ash cabinets were designed by JIG Design Build, the fabrication arm of Gray Organschi Architecture. Photo by Andrea Chu.

    Photo by: Andrea Chu

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  Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan collaborated with Gray Organschi on their midcentury-inspired New York vacation home. Photos Floto + Warner  Photo by: Floto + Warner

    Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan collaborated with Gray Organschi on their midcentury-inspired New York vacation home. Photos Floto + Warner

    Photo by: Floto + Warner

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  “The vibe feels cozy even though the living room is quite grand,” Adler says. He made the room divider out of concrete and integrated the sofa with the step. Lee Jofa fabric covers the dining chairs and the pendants are vintage.  Photo by: Floto + Warner

    “The vibe feels cozy even though the living room is quite grand,” Adler says. He made the room divider out of concrete and integrated the sofa with the step. Lee Jofa fabric covers the dining chairs and the pendants are vintage.

    Photo by: Floto + Warner

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  By the time Gray Organschi saw the church-turned residence their clients had selected, it had already been gutted. The residents had wanted to take it down to its ribs to prevent future surprises, so the architects could see exactly what they would be working with. The interior design was “meant to work as a counterpoint to the very simple, dignified, historic building” that serves as its envelope, Gray says, to be distinctly and absolutely “other.”  Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    By the time Gray Organschi saw the church-turned residence their clients had selected, it had already been gutted. The residents had wanted to take it down to its ribs to prevent future surprises, so the architects could see exactly what they would be working with. The interior design was “meant to work as a counterpoint to the very simple, dignified, historic building” that serves as its envelope, Gray says, to be distinctly and absolutely “other.”

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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  On the mantel above the fireplace, a Warhol collage is surrounded by a papier-mâché sculpture of no special provenance, a Vigliaturo glass piece, and a Picasso plate. Photo by Juliana Sohn.  Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    On the mantel above the fireplace, a Warhol collage is surrounded by a papier-mâché sculpture of no special provenance, a Vigliaturo glass piece, and a Picasso plate. Photo by Juliana Sohn.

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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