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In the hot and humid South, time seems to stand still and the architecture is often no different. But in New Orleans, Bild Design, headed by local boy Byron Mouton, is hoping to change that.

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  A view of the Zimple Street house from the Mississippi River levee, designed by Byron Mouton and his colleague Don Gatzke.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    A view of the Zimple Street house from the Mississippi River levee, designed by Byron Mouton and his colleague Don Gatzke.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  Byron Mouton and girlfriend, Julie Charvat watch the world go by, New Orleans style.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    Byron Mouton and girlfriend, Julie Charvat watch the world go by, New Orleans style.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  In the living room, a coffee table adapted from old piano parts meets vintage red Alky chairs by Giancarlo Pirette for Castelli.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    In the living room, a coffee table adapted from old piano parts meets vintage red Alky chairs by Giancarlo Pirette for Castelli.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  Custom furniture softens the house’s aesthetics, including a dining table by AXIS Millwork and Fabrications. Ceiling fan by Craftmade.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    Custom furniture softens the house’s aesthetics, including a dining table by AXIS Millwork and Fabrications. Ceiling fan by Craftmade.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  Windows on the third floor frame views of the Mississippi River.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    Windows on the third floor frame views of the Mississippi River.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  Charvat relaxes in the bedroom.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    Charvat relaxes in the bedroom.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  Familiar building elements applied in unexpected ways and a strict rectilinear palette help unify the two building forms. The scale is just right for creating cozy outdoor rooms.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    Familiar building elements applied in unexpected ways and a strict rectilinear palette help unify the two building forms. The scale is just right for creating cozy outdoor rooms.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  The ground-floor office is flooded with light from two sides.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    The ground-floor office is flooded with light from two sides.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  Byron Mouton of Bild Design combined three distinct interior spaces on one oversized urban lot in New Orleans to create his own home. In the bathroom, unexpected materials, such as a cement board shower surround, were often cheaper and easier to install than more traditional ones. “We made design decisions based on what we knew was easily available,” Mouton recalls. “The trick was to assemble these materials to express qualities that aren’t normally evident.” Read the entire article here.  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    Byron Mouton of Bild Design combined three distinct interior spaces on one oversized urban lot in New Orleans to create his own home. In the bathroom, unexpected materials, such as a cement board shower surround, were often cheaper and easier to install than more traditional ones. “We made design decisions based on what we knew was easily available,” Mouton recalls. “The trick was to assemble these materials to express qualities that aren’t normally evident.” Read the entire article here.

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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  The living room of the tower transitions to a sizable balcony overlooking a private rear courtyard. As Gatzke notes, the design of the house emphasizes flexibility and 
evolution of uses for the three distinct spaces: “The ground-floor ‘bar’ unit could be 
internally connected to the studio apartment and upper floors, allowing it to be rented or combined as a larger single unit.”  Photo by: Amy Eckert
    The living room of the tower transitions to a sizable balcony overlooking a private rear courtyard. As Gatzke notes, the design of the house emphasizes flexibility and evolution of uses for the three distinct spaces: “The ground-floor ‘bar’ unit could be internally connected to the studio apartment and upper floors, allowing it to be rented or combined as a larger single unit.”

    Photo by: Amy Eckert

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