Above the Fray

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photos by:
August 21, 2012

How a Bay Area architect who toggles his time between the coasts found his home away from home in a modern Manhattan high-rise.

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  Architect Cass Calder Smith embarked on a gut renovation to join two apartments inside a SoHo building, resulting in a 1,600-square-foot residence. He redid the floors in oak and redesigned the wall of windows that frames views to the east.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    Architect Cass Calder Smith embarked on a gut renovation to join two apartments inside a SoHo building, resulting in a 1,600-square-foot residence. He redid the floors in oak and redesigned the wall of windows that frames views to the east. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  In the seating area, a David Weeks armchair is next to a vintage console and Italian coffee table that Calder Smith found on 1stdibs.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    In the seating area, a David Weeks armchair is next to a vintage console and Italian coffee table that Calder Smith found on 1stdibs. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  The openness of the space is underscored by largely neutral furnishings. The window wall is surrounded by a Benjamin Moore hue that matches the dark, bronze-colored aluminum frames.  In the restrained Bulthaup kitchen, a large-scale photograph of a jet by Jeffrey Millstein is a major focal point. The Saarinen table is from Knoll; the Eames chairs are from Herman Miller.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    The openness of the space is underscored by largely neutral furnishings. The window wall is surrounded by a Benjamin Moore hue that matches the dark, bronze-colored aluminum frames. In the restrained Bulthaup kitchen, a large-scale photograph of a jet by Jeffrey Millstein is a major focal point. The Saarinen table is from Knoll; the Eames chairs are from Herman Miller. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  No room for a built-in bar? Wing it, like architect Cass Calder Smith did in his SoHo apartment, with a modern cabinet, trays to hold bottles and glasses, and a roaring “fire.”Photo by Brian Finke.   Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.

    No room for a built-in bar? Wing it, like architect Cass Calder Smith did in his SoHo apartment, with a modern cabinet, trays to hold bottles and glasses, and a roaring “fire.”Photo by Brian Finke

    Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  Once the sun sets, the main spaces are illuminated via pieces from No. 8 Lighting, recessed within a three-inch-deep slot in the ceiling.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    Once the sun sets, the main spaces are illuminated via pieces from No. 8 Lighting, recessed within a three-inch-deep slot in the ceiling. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  Calder Smith created the custom bookcase to delineate the seating area and the entrance hallway.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    Calder Smith created the custom bookcase to delineate the seating area and the entrance hallway. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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    Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  For a recent cocktail party, Calder Smith served white and red wine in Alessi glassware. Thad Vogler, of Bar Agricole in San Francisco, devised a custom cocktail served in tumblers from Spieglau.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    For a recent cocktail party, Calder Smith served white and red wine in Alessi glassware. Thad Vogler, of Bar Agricole in San Francisco, devised a custom cocktail served in tumblers from Spieglau. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  White platters from Crate & Barrel allowed the food—lox, crudités, and  cornichons—to stand out atop the Saarinen table.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    White platters from Crate & Barrel allowed the food—lox, crudités, and cornichons—to stand out atop the Saarinen table. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  A tulip table is the perfect height for snacking on kid appropriate apple slices and crackers in architect Cass Calder Smith’s New York high-rise. Photo by Brian Finke.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  DeLuca's seafood tower delivered straight from his restaurant Giorgione on Spring Street.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    DeLuca's seafood tower delivered straight from his restaurant Giorgione on Spring Street. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  Assembling the seafood tower, courtesy Giorgione restaurant.  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    Assembling the seafood tower, courtesy Giorgione restaurant. Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  Calder Smith uses his elliptical table, designed in 1956 by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, as a place for both dining and working. “It’s not as heavy as you might think, so it’s easy to move around,” says the architect. “Plus the base allows room for lots of legs—we’ve had up to eight people sitting around it at one time.”  Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
    Calder Smith uses his elliptical table, designed in 1956 by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, as a place for both dining and working. “It’s not as heavy as you might think, so it’s easy to move around,” says the architect. “Plus the base allows room for lots of legs—we’ve had up to eight people sitting around it at one time.” Courtesy of BRIAN FINKE.
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  The floor plan.
    The floor plan.
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