June 30, 2014
Sometimes you need a room to do double or even triple duty. These transformative furniture units take versatility to a whole new level.
Lowering the custom encased Murphy bed

To make the most of a small Warsaw apartment, designers Becky Nix and Aleksander Novak-Zemplinski invented the Cube, a robot-like apparatus that unfolds into a guestroom. Photo by Andreas Meichsner.

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©Andreas Meichsner
Originally appeared in Warsaw Loft with Multifunctional Furniture
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Green plywood door shelf space

A Tokyo architect maximized space in her 940-square-foot apartment by cutting a hole in the wall between her bedroom and workroom and then installing a door that swings open to reveal built-in bookshelves, thus expanding the workroom and partitioning the bedroom at the same time. At night, the apartment swiftly morphs back into a residence. Photo by Ryohei Hamada.

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Originally appeared in Simple Division
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All it takes is gentle downward pressure to lower the desk to the floor, bringing the kid-size mattress into position for bedtime.

Having a home office in a tiny Manhattan apartment might seem impossible, but in this inventive home, flexible furniture transforms one room into two. All this unit takes is a gentle push to lower the desk to the floor, bringing the kid-size mattress into position for bedtime. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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Originally appeared in Storage-Smart Renovation in New York City
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Perforated screen in Manhattan apartment

An Upper West Side apartment’s all-in-one cabinet provides storage space in its fully closed position and doubles as bedroom and home office when unfolded. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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Originally appeared in Space-Efficient Renovation in New York
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Multipurpose walnut dining table in kitchen

Rosa and Robert Garneau squeeze maximum functionality out their 650-square-foot Chelsea apartment thanks to an adjustable dining-room table set on hydraulic legs. The table allows for up to four presets, so the couple has one for dining, one for working, and two for cooking, depending on who’s the chef. Photo by Ian Allen.

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Originally appeared in Stow Aways
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Here, the view of both beds open. Click <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IftSA2sy3bg">here</a> to watch a video of the transformations. Photo by Sadamu Saito.

Japanese architect Toshihiko Suzuki installed an island based on kenchikukagu, which means “architectural furniture,” in a revamped Airstream. The island folds open to reveal a kitchen and either a dining table for six or two twin-sized beds. Photo by Sadamu Saito.

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Sadamu Saito
Originally appeared in Hide and Sleep
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Small apartment in Manhattan, New York

John Handley of pulltab design made the most of a couple’s 700-square-foot Manhattan apartment with a simple design for a stow-away table that unfolds to transform the living area into a dining room.

Originally appeared in Hide and Eat
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Milan Hughston's quiet street in Manhattan's West Village is moments from the neighborhood's boutique shopping and nocturnal ruckuses. Architect Joel Sanders made Hughston's space multi-functional; here it's shown as a living room, for relaxing or enterta

A custom-made Murphy bed, foldaway Formica tabletop, and storage-concealing curtain wall transform a 400-square-foot Manhattan apartment into a fully functional home. Photo by Grant Delin.

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Originally appeared in One Room Fits All
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Lowering the custom encased Murphy bed

To make the most of a small Warsaw apartment, designers Becky Nix and Aleksander Novak-Zemplinski invented the Cube, a robot-like apparatus that unfolds into a guestroom. Photo by Andreas Meichsner.

Photo by Andreas Meichsner. Image courtesy of ©Andreas Meichsner.

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