7 Long Island Homes We Love

written by:
April 30, 2014
Long Island boasts both extravagant mansions and cozy cottages, original new structures and inspired renovations. Here, we take a look at some of Dwell's favorite Long Island homes.
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  In renovating this Long Island summer home, the owners wanted to preserve a sense of the past while adapting the home to present needs. By combining new materials and vintage pieces, they created a timeless home. Here, owner Joe Dolce sits on a vintage 1950s couch he found at a thrift store in Asbury Park, New Jersey, while the Flokati rug came from a thrift store in Florida. Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by: Raimund Koch

    In renovating this Long Island summer home, the owners wanted to preserve a sense of the past while adapting the home to present needs. By combining new materials and vintage pieces, they created a timeless home. Here, owner Joe Dolce sits on a vintage 1950s couch he found at a thrift store in Asbury Park, New Jersey, while the Flokati rug came from a thrift store in Florida. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  When the Fisher family’s 1960s Long Island beach bungalow started to crumble, they sought an architect who would preserve the home’s history while subtly bringing the place up to date. The open-plan living-kitchen-dining area is a repository of design icons, both classic and contemporary. There’s a Louis Poulsen pendant lamp over the Eero Saarinen dining table, Mirror Ball pendants by Tom Dixon over the kitchen counter, and Tab F1 floor lamps from Flos behind the Edward Wormley–designed Dunbar sofa. In the living room, chairs modeled on Jens Risom’s swivel design enable people to face either the sofa or to spin 180 degrees toward the kitchen. Photo by Richard Foulser.  Photo by: Richard Foulser

    When the Fisher family’s 1960s Long Island beach bungalow started to crumble, they sought an architect who would preserve the home’s history while subtly bringing the place up to date. The open-plan living-kitchen-dining area is a repository of design icons, both classic and contemporary. There’s a Louis Poulsen pendant lamp over the Eero Saarinen dining table, Mirror Ball pendants by Tom Dixon over the kitchen counter, and Tab F1 floor lamps from Flos behind the Edward Wormley–designed Dunbar sofa. In the living room, chairs modeled on Jens Risom’s swivel design enable people to face either the sofa or to spin 180 degrees toward the kitchen. Photo by Richard Foulser.

    Photo by: Richard Foulser

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  The site-sensitive exterior of Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan's Shelter Island summer home belies an interior festooned with a kaleidoscopic mix of colors and an array of tactile materials. The Peter rug, Malibu sofa, and ceramics are Adler’s own designs. The tables, pendant lights, and rocker are vintage. Adler and Doonan used scaffolding from the house’s construction to build the bookshelf. Photo by Floto + Warner.  Photo by: Floto + Warner

    The site-sensitive exterior of Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan's Shelter Island summer home belies an interior festooned with a kaleidoscopic mix of colors and an array of tactile materials. The Peter rug, Malibu sofa, and ceramics are Adler’s own designs. The tables, pendant lights, and rocker are vintage. Adler and Doonan used scaffolding from the house’s construction to build the bookshelf. Photo by Floto + Warner.

    Photo by: Floto + Warner

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  The owners of this Shelter Island cottage wanted to make sure their home responded to the forces of the site—its sounds, breezes, views and lighting. The kitchen, dining, and living areas are separated by breezeway from the master suite and the children’s bedrooms, allowing the sound of the waves to echo throughout the home. “It's all about outdoor living,” explains owner and architect, Cary Tamarkin. “[The house] is small inside but it was meant to be that way." Photo by Bart Michiels.  Photo by: Bart Michiels

    The owners of this Shelter Island cottage wanted to make sure their home responded to the forces of the site—its sounds, breezes, views and lighting. The kitchen, dining, and living areas are separated by breezeway from the master suite and the children’s bedrooms, allowing the sound of the waves to echo throughout the home. “It's all about outdoor living,” explains owner and architect, Cary Tamarkin. “[The house] is small inside but it was meant to be that way." Photo by Bart Michiels.

    Photo by: Bart Michiels

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  This Montauk home was assembled, rather than built, with a prefabricated foundation, concrete panel siding, and efficient built-ins, minimizing construction debris and toxins such as concrete foundation tar on the site. Photo by Ty Cole.  Photo by: Ty ColeCourtesy of: © TY COLE

    This Montauk home was assembled, rather than built, with a prefabricated foundation, concrete panel siding, and efficient built-ins, minimizing construction debris and toxins such as concrete foundation tar on the site. Photo by Ty Cole.

    Photo by: Ty Cole

    Courtesy of: © TY COLE

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  This Amagansett beach house has it all: green technology, passive solar design, rich materials, and an expansive feeling, despite its petite corner lot. Photo by Patrick Bernard.  Courtesy of: Jeff Heatley

    This Amagansett beach house has it all: green technology, passive solar design, rich materials, and an expansive feeling, despite its petite corner lot. Photo by Patrick Bernard.

    Courtesy of: Jeff Heatley

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  Charles Gwathmey’s residential masterpiece, a modest but pioneering home for his parents in the Hamptons, looks as fresh today as it did in 1965. Photo by Norman McGrath.  Photo by: Norman McGrath

    Charles Gwathmey’s residential masterpiece, a modest but pioneering home for his parents in the Hamptons, looks as fresh today as it did in 1965. Photo by Norman McGrath.

    Photo by: Norman McGrath

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