6 Striking Modern Houses in Toronto

written by:
August 19, 2013
The city of Toronto has many facets—and as Canada's largest metropolitan area, it's got a concentration of modern residences that does the local architecture scene proud.
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  Young architects often design homes for their parents. But for Toronto's Julia Knezic, it was an especially intimate job: her mom Susan Farkas's new house is next to her own. The result is a new 2,100-square-foot open-plan house, with generous public rooms and only one bedroom.  Photo by: Sean GalbraithCourtesy of: Sean Galbraith

    Young architects often design homes for their parents. But for Toronto's Julia Knezic, it was an especially intimate job: her mom Susan Farkas's new house is next to her own. The result is a new 2,100-square-foot open-plan house, with generous public rooms and only one bedroom.

    Photo by: Sean Galbraith

    Courtesy of: Sean Galbraith

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  In the house’s front room Monkman relaxes on a stool from local retailer Andrew Richard Designs. A new window system draws in sunlight and views of the front courtyard designed by local landscape architect Terry McGlade, the building’s former owner.  Photo by: Matthew WilliamsCourtesy of: matthew williams
    In the house’s front room Monkman relaxes on a stool from local retailer Andrew Richard Designs. A new window system draws in sunlight and views of the front courtyard designed by local landscape architect Terry McGlade, the building’s former owner.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Courtesy of: matthew williams

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  For a Toronto couple with a love of minimalist Japanese architecture, a sleek, storage-packed kitchen was the first priority in their home's renovation.  Photo by: Bob Gundu

    For a Toronto couple with a love of minimalist Japanese architecture, a sleek, storage-packed kitchen was the first priority in their home's renovation.

    Photo by: Bob Gundu

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  Facing tight building codes and an even tighter space, Karen White and David MacNaughtan needed an architect who could turn lemons into lemonade. Donald Chong devised a refreshing solution: a bright three-story abode on a lot narrower than most suburban driveways.

    Facing tight building codes and an even tighter space, Karen White and David MacNaughtan needed an architect who could turn lemons into lemonade. Donald Chong devised a refreshing solution: a bright three-story abode on a lot narrower than most suburban driveways.

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  A house from the 1880s that's narrow, small, and in terrible shape: is this the place for a great modern interior? In the hands of Toronto architect Heather Dubbeldam, it turned out to be exactly that. Dubbeldam used a variety of strategies to keep it green (the tiny utility bills prove this), but also created remarkably rich spaces and textures in this small house and equally tight yard.  Photo by: Bob Gundu

    A house from the 1880s that's narrow, small, and in terrible shape: is this the place for a great modern interior? In the hands of Toronto architect Heather Dubbeldam, it turned out to be exactly that. Dubbeldam used a variety of strategies to keep it green (the tiny utility bills prove this), but also created remarkably rich spaces and textures in this small house and equally tight yard.

    Photo by: Bob Gundu

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  Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces.  Photo by: Naomi FinlayCourtesy of: © 2012 Naomi Finlay

    Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces.

    Photo by: Naomi Finlay

    Courtesy of: © 2012 Naomi Finlay

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  Bonus! Photographer Kevin Morris's online project House of the Day, which documents "the character, quirkiness, and beauty of everyday residential architecture" in Toronto neighborhoods.  Photo by: Kevin Morris

    Bonus! Photographer Kevin Morris's online project House of the Day, which documents "the character, quirkiness, and beauty of everyday residential architecture" in Toronto neighborhoods.

    Photo by: Kevin Morris

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