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10 Tiny Houses We Love

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We've dedicated the pages in our November 2012 issue to living large in small spaces, whether they're 235, 900, or 2,000 square feet. But there's more! The Dwell archive features scores of small space projects, and 10 of the tiniest are corralled in this gallery of images, ranging from a bite-sized Bratislava apartment to a bright and airy renovation in Belgium.

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  The budget was nearly as tight as the space in this cheerful renovation of a 516-square-foot flat in Bratislava. The meat of the renovation focused on removing barriers, but Lukáš Kordík did add a partition between the kitchen and the bathroom. The translucent glass wall does triple duty by delineating the space of the dining room, letting light into the bathroom, and backing bookshelves and culinary storage made from black film­–faced plywood. The centerpiece of Lukáš Kordík’s new kitchen is the cabinetry surrounding the sink, a feat he managed by altering the facing and pulls of an off-the-rack Ikea system.
    The budget was nearly as tight as the space in this cheerful renovation of a 516-square-foot flat in Bratislava. The meat of the renovation focused on removing barriers, but Lukáš Kordík did add a partition between the kitchen and the bathroom. The translucent glass wall does triple duty by delineating the space of the dining room, letting light into the bathroom, and backing bookshelves and culinary storage made from black film­–faced plywood. The centerpiece of Lukáš Kordík’s new kitchen is the cabinetry surrounding the sink, a feat he managed by altering the facing and pulls of an off-the-rack Ikea system.
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  In Oakland, California, two designers transformed a 100-year-old, 400-square-foot barn barn into cozy home of their own. Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.  Photo by: Aya Brackett
    In Oakland, California, two designers transformed a 100-year-old, 400-square-foot barn barn into cozy home of their own. Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.

    Photo by: Aya Brackett

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  When the Zimmerman family settled in Seattle, Washington, in the late 1990s they bought a 1,100-square-foot Craftsman built in the 1920s. Fast-forward to today. Not wanting to leave their beloved neighborhood, but hurting for space, they enlisted the help of local design-build firm Ninebark to create a separate living area. Working from sketches that the residents had from their uncle, Gary Schoemaker, an architect in New York, Ninebark realized a refined structure that serves as a playroom, office, and guesthouse for visitors, complete with a kitchenette and full bathroom.
    When the Zimmerman family settled in Seattle, Washington, in the late 1990s they bought a 1,100-square-foot Craftsman built in the 1920s. Fast-forward to today. Not wanting to leave their beloved neighborhood, but hurting for space, they enlisted the help of local design-build firm Ninebark to create a separate living area. Working from sketches that the residents had from their uncle, Gary Schoemaker, an architect in New York, Ninebark realized a refined structure that serves as a playroom, office, and guesthouse for visitors, complete with a kitchenette and full bathroom.
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  How do you squeeze maximum functionality out of minimal space? Rosa and Robert Garneau make it happen with multipurpose furniture, a hydraulic Murphy bed, and secret compartments galore. An adjustable dining-room table is relatively common in Europe, according to the couple, who ordered their hydraulic legs from Switzerland. They allow for up to four presets, so the Garneaus have one for dining, one for working, and two for cooking, depending on who’s the chef. The table itself was designed by Robert’s firm, Studio Garneau, and has five drawers in it, some big enough to store Robert’s oversize flat artwork.  Photo by: Ian Allen
    How do you squeeze maximum functionality out of minimal space? Rosa and Robert Garneau make it happen with multipurpose furniture, a hydraulic Murphy bed, and secret compartments galore. An adjustable dining-room table is relatively common in Europe, according to the couple, who ordered their hydraulic legs from Switzerland. They allow for up to four presets, so the Garneaus have one for dining, one for working, and two for cooking, depending on who’s the chef. The table itself was designed by Robert’s firm, Studio Garneau, and has five drawers in it, some big enough to store Robert’s oversize flat artwork.

    Photo by: Ian Allen

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  On a quaint, tree-lined street in Berkeley, California, architect Sarah Deeds of Deeds Design and carpenter John McBride placed a 120-square-foot office/art studio near their main house, a renovated 1906 Victorian. “It’s like a little fort,” says Deeds. The studio’s redwood siding was milled from trees salvaged from a road-widening project in Sonoma County, California.  Courtesy of: © Lenny Gonzalez 2010
    On a quaint, tree-lined street in Berkeley, California, architect Sarah Deeds of Deeds Design and carpenter John McBride placed a 120-square-foot office/art studio near their main house, a renovated 1906 Victorian. “It’s like a little fort,” says Deeds. The studio’s redwood siding was milled from trees salvaged from a road-widening project in Sonoma County, California.

    Courtesy of: © Lenny Gonzalez 2010

  • 
  When it came time for Hernan Rios to renovate his apartment inside a 1968 Louis Herman De Koninck building, he reached out to Matteo Colombo and Andrea Serboli's Barcelona-based firm CaSA. Located in the center of Brussels, Belgium, the Brutalist structure is now the home of a newly bright and crisp interior inspired by the über-clean simplicity of European hotels.
    When it came time for Hernan Rios to renovate his apartment inside a 1968 Louis Herman De Koninck building, he reached out to Matteo Colombo and Andrea Serboli's Barcelona-based firm CaSA. Located in the center of Brussels, Belgium, the Brutalist structure is now the home of a newly bright and crisp interior inspired by the über-clean simplicity of European hotels.
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  New Yorkers often work, eat, sleep, and entertain in a single room. But for Milan Hughston, a renovation of a 400-square-foot apartment turned that predicament into a pleasure. "I’ve always fantasized about living in one room," he says. Checking email over coffee, Hughston places his laptop on the fold-down Formica table that Joel Sanders designed. Jack Lenor Larsen's Cybelle fabric covers the wall on his right. Above the sofa hangs an Italian pendant lamp of mysterious origin.  Photo by: Grant Delin
    New Yorkers often work, eat, sleep, and entertain in a single room. But for Milan Hughston, a renovation of a 400-square-foot apartment turned that predicament into a pleasure. "I’ve always fantasized about living in one room," he says. Checking email over coffee, Hughston places his laptop on the fold-down Formica table that Joel Sanders designed. Jack Lenor Larsen's Cybelle fabric covers the wall on his right. Above the sofa hangs an Italian pendant lamp of mysterious origin.

    Photo by: Grant Delin

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  When San Francisco–based architect Christi Azevedo and her partner bought an investment property in Oakland, what was billed in real estate listings as a 'detached garage' turned out to be a 360-square-foot carriage house that dated from 1908. The living room walls are inexpensive pine siding sprayed with white oil paint. The shelves above are 1/4-inch plywood perched on makeshift rods made from 1/2-inch conduit stuck into the studs. "It's all very low-tech and kind of hilarious," she says.
    When San Francisco–based architect Christi Azevedo and her partner bought an investment property in Oakland, what was billed in real estate listings as a 'detached garage' turned out to be a 360-square-foot carriage house that dated from 1908. The living room walls are inexpensive pine siding sprayed with white oil paint. The shelves above are 1/4-inch plywood perched on makeshift rods made from 1/2-inch conduit stuck into the studs. "It's all very low-tech and kind of hilarious," she says.
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  Megan Lea built a backyard retreat with reclaimed materials figuring prominently into the design. What resulted is a polychrome of salvaged 100-year-old barnwood by West Salem-based Barnwood Naturals that makes the facade of this Bernard Maybeck-inspired design as unique as it is environmentally friendly.  Photo by: Uwe Schneider
    Megan Lea built a backyard retreat with reclaimed materials figuring prominently into the design. What resulted is a polychrome of salvaged 100-year-old barnwood by West Salem-based Barnwood Naturals that makes the facade of this Bernard Maybeck-inspired design as unique as it is environmentally friendly.

    Photo by: Uwe Schneider

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  And for a tiny home of a different breed, we turn to architect Keith Moskow's Chicken Chapel," a project he completed with the help of five eager students.
    And for a tiny home of a different breed, we turn to architect Keith Moskow's Chicken Chapel," a project he completed with the help of five eager students.

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