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10 Modern Brick Homes

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Brick is most often associated with traditional building styles, from Gothic to Georgian. Brickwork and mortar can be applied to a fresh, modern house, however—just look to these ten examples for proof.
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  Tasked with renovating a 93-square-foot brick boiler room in San Francisco, architect Christi Azevedo deployed some creative solutions. She retained the brick walls and added sleek industrial details as counterpoints: Ikea cabinetry in the kitchen, sliding doors of sanded acrylic panels, a PaperStone work top, stainless steel counter, and a movable dining table. Photo by Cesar Rubio.

    Tasked with renovating a 93-square-foot brick boiler room in San Francisco, architect Christi Azevedo deployed some creative solutions. She retained the brick walls and added sleek industrial details as counterpoints: Ikea cabinetry in the kitchen, sliding doors of sanded acrylic panels, a PaperStone work top, stainless steel counter, and a movable dining table. Photo by Cesar Rubio.

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  During the renovation of this Texas home, the residents noted that they would prefer to keep some elements of the original design, including the sandy brick lower level. Alterstudio Architects won the AIA Austin 2010 Design Awards' Honor Award for this project. 

    During the renovation of this Texas home, the residents noted that they would prefer to keep some elements of the original design, including the sandy brick lower level. Alterstudio Architects won the AIA Austin 2010 Design Awards' Honor Award for this project. 

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  Once a horse stable, this Chicago house first got a superficial makeover before architect Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang was called in for a more substantial renovation and a dazzlingly porous brick screen. Here, the owner and his dog Jack enjoy the house’s walled garden. Photo by Gregg Segal. 

    Once a horse stable, this Chicago house first got a superficial makeover before architect Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang was called in for a more substantial renovation and a dazzlingly porous brick screen. Here, the owner and his dog Jack enjoy the house’s walled garden. Photo by Gregg Segal. 

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  This Boerum Hill brownstone, designed by MADE, is a good example of turning exposed interior brick into something more modern and Shaker-inspired—just by painting it all white. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    This Boerum Hill brownstone, designed by MADE, is a good example of turning exposed interior brick into something more modern and Shaker-inspired—just by painting it all white. Photo by Matthew Williams.

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  For this street-side facade, seven tall, slim windows are screened by DMVA Architects calls “knitted” bricks. “In this part of Belgium, 90 percent of the houses are built with brick,” says lead architect Tom Verschueren. “It’s a classic material that we tried to use in House BVA in a totally different way.” Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

    For this street-side facade, seven tall, slim windows are screened by DMVA Architects calls “knitted” bricks. “In this part of Belgium, 90 percent of the houses are built with brick,” says lead architect Tom Verschueren. “It’s a classic material that we tried to use in House BVA in a totally different way.” Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

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  One approach for the industrially-minded brick layer is the cinderblock. This 18-foot-wide apartment building in Pittsburgh with a glass-and-steel facade is a glowing example of the urban renaissance that's gripping Steel City, and its interior wall treatment tip an appropriate hat to the area's industrial past. Photo by Roger Davies.

    One approach for the industrially-minded brick layer is the cinderblock. This 18-foot-wide apartment building in Pittsburgh with a glass-and-steel facade is a glowing example of the urban renaissance that's gripping Steel City, and its interior wall treatment tip an appropriate hat to the area's industrial past. Photo by Roger Davies.

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  For his completely gutted and rearranged Brooklyn home, architect Jeff Sherman figured his ultra-modern interiors were best complemented by cleaning up the original brickwork while leaving it otherwise untouched. The front door is made from etched Lexan bulletproof glass. Photo by Dustin Aksland.

    For his completely gutted and rearranged Brooklyn home, architect Jeff Sherman figured his ultra-modern interiors were best complemented by cleaning up the original brickwork while leaving it otherwise untouched. The front door is made from etched Lexan bulletproof glass. Photo by Dustin Aksland.

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  In another case for leaving existing brickwork, British architect Carl Turner stripped the renovated barn's other ornamentation, painted its surroundings a crisp white, and accented the material with off-the-rack OSB plywood. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.

    In another case for leaving existing brickwork, British architect Carl Turner stripped the renovated barn's other ornamentation, painted its surroundings a crisp white, and accented the material with off-the-rack OSB plywood. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.

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  By introducing chic new elements, a Belgian couple takes a gentle approach to transforming a tired house into a vibrant workshop. The brick facade is original to the 1930s house, and the couple rebuilt the annex, which houses the kitchen and bath. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    By introducing chic new elements, a Belgian couple takes a gentle approach to transforming a tired house into a vibrant workshop. The brick facade is original to the 1930s house, and the couple rebuilt the annex, which houses the kitchen and bath. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

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  For a renovation located in Glebe—an inner-city suburb of Sydney, Australia—Carterwilliamson Architects took an environmentally friendly tack. They repurposed an existing brick structure, a 19th century cow shed, while relying on passive heating and cooling principles and natural daylight to guide the project. Photo by Brett Boardman.

    For a renovation located in Glebe—an inner-city suburb of Sydney, Australia—Carterwilliamson Architects took an environmentally friendly tack. They repurposed an existing brick structure, a 19th century cow shed, while relying on passive heating and cooling principles and natural daylight to guide the project. Photo by Brett Boardman.

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