March 21, 2014
When renovating or adding on to your home, a perfectly rectangular room may not be available, see these seven creative ways to carve out bedroom space.
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  A top floor bedroom often means attic space, especially in older houses. This mint  bedroom atop a New York penthouse tucks a bed into a tight nook. Photo by David Hotson  Courtesy of David Hotson.  This originally appeared in 6 Airy Attic Renovations.

    A top floor bedroom often means attic space, especially in older houses. This mint  bedroom atop a New York penthouse tucks a bed into a tight nook. Photo by David Hotson

    Courtesy of David Hotson.
    This originally appeared in 6 Airy Attic Renovations.
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  In Belgium, a home’s cramped layout meant some serious reconfiguring. The living room was moved near the garden and the previous space it occupied was turned into a split-level bedroom. A fireplace in the lounge area and a sleeping area that opens onto the garden make it dreamy rather than cold. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse  Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.   This originally appeared in A Concrete Home in Rural Belgium.

    In Belgium, a home’s cramped layout meant some serious reconfiguring. The living room was moved near the garden and the previous space it occupied was turned into a split-level bedroom. A fireplace in the lounge area and a sleeping area that opens onto the garden make it dreamy rather than cold. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse

    Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.
    This originally appeared in A Concrete Home in Rural Belgium.
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  In Omer Arbel’s Vancouver bedroom, a light by Bretford in Chicago is next to an Ikea Malm bed topped with Indian linens and folk weavings. The rug is from Paola Lenti. A Bocci 19 brass bowl sits near a hamper from Connected Fair Trade Goods. A console runs the length of the far wall, utilizing otherwise difficult-to-access space. Photo by José Mandojana.  Photo by José Mandojana.   This originally appeared in Designer Omer Arbel's Eclectic Home in Vancouver.

    In Omer Arbel’s Vancouver bedroom, a light by Bretford in Chicago is next to an Ikea Malm bed topped with Indian linens and folk weavings. The rug is from Paola Lenti. A Bocci 19 brass bowl sits near a hamper from Connected Fair Trade Goods. A console runs the length of the far wall, utilizing otherwise difficult-to-access space. Photo by José Mandojana.

    Photo by José Mandojana.
    This originally appeared in Designer Omer Arbel's Eclectic Home in Vancouver.
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  In a 580-square-foot Hollywood bungalow, a heavy velvet curtain slides across to shield the bedroom from the rest of the open space, creating privacy without walls. Photo by Joe Pugliese.  Photo by Joe Pugliese.   This originally appeared in How to Design with Red.

    In a 580-square-foot Hollywood bungalow, a heavy velvet curtain slides across to shield the bedroom from the rest of the open space, creating privacy without walls. Photo by Joe Pugliese.

    Photo by Joe Pugliese.
    This originally appeared in How to Design with Red.
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  A 520-square-foot backyard retreat was made with a steeply pitched roof to match the main house’s design. The low ceilings posed a problem for standard furniture, but custom built-ins by Phloem Studio made the room appear to be “carved from a single piece of wood.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.  Photo by Lincoln Barbour.   This originally appeared in Salvaged Wood Renovation in Portland.

    A 520-square-foot backyard retreat was made with a steeply pitched roof to match the main house’s design. The low ceilings posed a problem for standard furniture, but custom built-ins by Phloem Studio made the room appear to be “carved from a single piece of wood.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
    This originally appeared in Salvaged Wood Renovation in Portland.
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  In Edge Studio's apartment building, sleeping space is adventurously tucked away in an alcove above the kitchen, accessible by a track ladder that slides along a rail mounted above the counter. Photo by Roger Davies.  Photo by Roger Davies.   This originally appeared in Steel Life.

    In Edge Studio's apartment building, sleeping space is adventurously tucked away in an alcove above the kitchen, accessible by a track ladder that slides along a rail mounted above the counter. Photo by Roger Davies.

    Photo by Roger Davies.
    This originally appeared in Steel Life.
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  A dormer on the south side of an Austin family’s house contains two bedrooms. One of the bedrooms features a reading loft carved out of the attic space above the dining room. The intersection of the gabled roof and the shed dormers allowed the residents to wrap large windows around each corner, taking advantage of the “borrowed landscape”—treetop views that root the house to its site. Photo by J.C. Schmiel   Courtesy of J.C. Schmiel.  This originally appeared in Family-Sized Addition for Renovated Austin Bungalow.
    A dormer on the south side of an Austin family’s house contains two bedrooms. One of the bedrooms features a reading loft carved out of the attic space above the dining room. The intersection of the gabled roof and the shed dormers allowed the residents to wrap large windows around each corner, taking advantage of the “borrowed landscape”—treetop views that root the house to its site. Photo by J.C. Schmiel
     
    Courtesy of J.C. Schmiel.
    This originally appeared in Family-Sized Addition for Renovated Austin Bungalow.
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Architect David Hotson and interior designer Ghislaine Viñas designed the alcove attic bedroom in this four-story penthouse in New York City

A top floor bedroom often means attic space, especially in older houses. This mint  bedroom atop a New York penthouse tucks a bed into a tight nook. Photo by David Hotson

Image courtesy of David Hotson.

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