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August 28, 2013
From architects to industrial designers working for Apple, Dwell has featured a wealth of designers' own houses. See how they carve out their own space in these eight great examples.
Londoner Marcus Lee turned a narrow lot next to a pickle works into a high-flying wood retreat with a garden out back and plenty of soaring space upstairs.

Taking inspiration from barns, warehouses, Case Study Houses, and Japanese residential architecture, architect Marcus Lee and his wife, Rachel Hart—an architectural model maker—created a unique timber-framed home in Hackney, London. Lee tells us how he created such a hardworking, flexible, and desirable family home.

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Originally appeared in Slanted and Enchanted
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Modern wooden garage door

Teaming up with architect Craig Steely, an industrial designer and a mechanical engineer find just the right design for a striking home on a San Francisco hill.

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Originally appeared in Striking Slatted Wood and Glass Home in San Francisco
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Modern kitchen with Pepe Cortès barstools and restored wooden beams

In a quiet corner of the famed Spanish party island, rug designer Nani Marquina and photographer Albert Font have carved out a serene, site-sensitive home.

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Originally appeared in Rug Designer Nani Marquina's Serene Home in Ibiza
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Community area space at The Miner and Major experiment in New York

The Miner and a Major is an experiment in communal living and fantastical form. A New York story of creativity born from hardscrabble circumstance, the project grew out of the joint imagination of three architects with a limited budget.

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Originally appeared in Communal Living on a Budget in Brooklyn
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Modern kitchen with beechwood countertop

What do you get when you give a couple of designers unlimited creative license on a very limited budget? For Andrew Dunbar and Zoee Astrakhan of Interstice Architects in San Francisco, the possibilities were limitless.

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Courtesy of 
justin fantl photography
Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Phoenix Arizona modern house

When Jay Atherton and Cy Keener met in grad school at the University of California, Berkeley, they discovered in each other a rare constellation of common interests: minimalist architecture, rock climbing, and “not talking.” After graduation, Atherton moved back to his hometown of Phoenix, Arizona, and purchased a downtown lot. Wanting to build a house, he asked Keener—a pro carpenter, then living in Colorado—to help with design and construction. Six months later, “His house became our house,” says Keener. “It became obvious the only way it would get built was if I shared the mortgage.” The roommates are now business partners: They founded a design firm, Atherton Keener, in 2007.

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Originally appeared in Startin' Spartan
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Finley rifles through one of the closets at the end of the living space next to the kitchen. The water-cut laundry-room doors and guardrail add a Houstonian touch to the otherwise spartan décor.

In Houston, where bigger means better and suburbanites in SUVs dominate the highways, architects Dawn Finley and Mark Wamble are anomalies: Their domestic lives fit into 1,200 square feet, and their commute to work is but a walk downstairs.

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Originally appeared in Houston, TX
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Dining room with Arne Jacobsen chairs

For Brussels-based furniture designer Christiane Högner, inspiration comes less from glossy design mags than the castoffs she finds on the streets of Belgium.

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Originally appeared in Kind of New
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Londoner Marcus Lee turned a narrow lot next to a pickle works into a high-flying wood retreat with a garden out back and plenty of soaring space upstairs.

Taking inspiration from barns, warehouses, Case Study Houses, and Japanese residential architecture, architect Marcus Lee and his wife, Rachel Hart—an architectural model maker—created a unique timber-framed home in Hackney, London. Lee tells us how he created such a hardworking, flexible, and desirable family home.

Photo by Jeremy Murch.

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