written by:
September 19, 2013
Concrete may seem brutalist to some, but consider its many applications: buff, polished, waxed, and turned into panels for a facade. Here are nine Dwell homes that make incredible use of the material.
Living room with polished concrete floors

Seeking a way to blend architecture into the natural environment, a pair of Ecuador-based designers invents a new modular building system using stacked concrete forms.

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Courtesy of 
Joao Canziani
Originally appeared in An Innovative Modular Building System in Ecuador
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Living room with modern furniture and concrete flooring

Designed for her parents and generations to come, Amanda Yates's seaside New Zealand house is "somewhere between architecture and landscape." The concrete bench in the living area just past the kitchen is built into the sloping wall.

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Courtesy of 
matthew williams
Originally appeared in A Place to Stand
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Casa Delpin concrete panels white facade

Casa Delpin in San Juan, Puerto Rico, features perforated concrete panels on its façade. (And don't miss the enormous concrete skylights on the interior, as well.)

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Originally appeared in San Juan, PR
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loft heights dining room

Architect Julien de Smedt's Belgium loft explains his appreciation for the material: “My apartment in Brussels is the most architect-like, with its concrete feel,” he says of his rather brutalist interior. “It puzzles me why more people aren’t into concrete—it’s the most practical material. It’s warm, if you do it right. And you can clean it in about two seconds.”

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Originally appeared in 5 Lofts Worth a Second Look
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In this Houston affordable townhouse development, naturally subtle tones predominate in the bathrooms, with Walker Zanger stone floors complemented by sanded concrete walls and dark mahogany cabinets topped by a slab of white marble. The exteriors also feature raw concrete, in combination with exposed reclaimed lumber.

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Originally appeared in Houston, We've Solved a Problem
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Rocks dug up during construction were saved and incorporated into the poured-concrete floors and walls. Hydronic heating coils in the floor are augmented by a wood stove during the damp winters.

Architect Ken Meffan's ten-years-in-the-making home is in the tiny Northern California town of Rough and Ready—a term that might as aptly refer to the house itself. Rocks dug up during construction were saved and incorporated into the poured-concrete floors and walls.

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Courtesy of 
Justin Reid
Originally appeared in Diamond in the Rough (and Ready)
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In furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti’s Buenos Aires home, raw materials are elevated to transcendent effect. A wood-and-steel open staircase wends its way up three stories, supported by a concrete structural wall embedded with PVC tubes and bare lightbulbs

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Crisobal Palma
Originally appeared in Step by Step
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As opposed to poured concrete, Lorcan O'Herlihy's home in Venice Beach, California sports rich, dark concrete panels and colorfully dispersed windows on its varied facade.

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Originally appeared in Kaleidoscopic Cabinet
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Living room with polished concrete floors

Seeking a way to blend architecture into the natural environment, a pair of Ecuador-based designers invents a new modular building system using stacked concrete forms.

Photo by João Canziani. Image courtesy of Joao Canziani.

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