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May 27, 2014
The warmth and natural beauty of wood—deployed indoors or outside—steals the show in these seven projects.
Walls and ceilings made out of reclaimed butternut wood

“It was a natural choice,” says Adrian Jones of using reclaimed and rescued wood in his Brooklyn renovation. “I didn’t want to chop down a whole lot of trees.” The walls and ceiling are lined with planks of butternut harvested from diseased trees in Vermont. Photo by Kevin Cooley.

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Originally appeared in In the Loop
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a gravel-lined courtyard features vintage metal outdoor table and chair and a cedar wood wall under the steel overhang of the roof

In the gravel-lined entry court of Jonathan Adler's Shelter Island vacation home, a Japanese maple tree, furniture from Beall and Bell—an antique shop in Greenport, New York—mixes with Pendant Globes by Primelite Manufacturing. Bobo pillows by Adler outfit the banquette, and cedar clads the interior of the seating area. Photo by Floto + Warner.

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Originally appeared in Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan's Shelter Island Vacation Home
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glass balcony among the trees

“This is very much a tree house in a lot of ways,” architect Noah Walker says of the modern house he built in an L.A. canyon. Taking cues in part from Kyoto’s Entsuji Temple and its long views of the countryside, he designed almost every room with giant windows—made with especially clear, low-iron glass—framing the tree canopy. He deployed a dark interior color palette to match the oaks’ deep greens and grays. Photo by Jose Mandojana

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Originally appeared in Modern Home Designed for Live Music in Beverly Hills
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modern backyard deck ipe wood

An ipe deck slopes sharply skyward behind Amy Persin’s house in Menlo Park, California, creating a secluded backyard getaway that feels like an outdoor extension of her living room. A single step on either side leads to patches of gravel, which her children have claimed as areas for unstructured play. Photo by Ike Edeani.

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Originally appeared in Bay Area Ipe-Clad Backyard Getaway
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modern fairhaven beach house blackbutt eucalyptus corridor hallway

The house that architect John Wardle designed for a couple in coastal Fairhaven, Australia, twists and bends to comply with local laws that prevent buildings from disrupting the ridgeline views from the Great Ocean Road. “The interior and exterior profiling match exactly, every crimp and contortion—hence the experience of moments of compression and moments of release.” This effect is most dramatic in the corridor that leads from the front door to the main living area. The hall slants and curves, keeping visitors tightly bound, until it opens suddenly into the glass-fronted expanse of the wood-wrapped lounge room. Ceilings, floors, and walls throughout the living area and bedrooms are wrapped in blackbutt eucalyptus. Photo by Sean Fennessy.

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Originally appeared in A Eucalyptus-Lined Oceanfront Home in Australia
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modular beachside getaway Australia exterior patio

For her family’s house near Melbourne, Anna Horne created a series of prefab wood modules using a design from the company Prebuilt. The Australian, plantation-grown silvertop ash cladding—dark-stained and installed horizontally—from Quantum Timber Finishes better allows the house to blend into the surrounding bush, while a lighter-stained Australian spotted gum, on the deck and on the overhead pergola, provides contrast. Photo by Lisa Cohen.

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Originally appeared in A Modular Beachside Getaway in Australia
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Wooten interior wood chair

Architect William Massie built a hybrid prefab home for vintage retailer Greg Wooten, who handled the interiors. Wooten handpicked every piece in the house, such as the 1955 Medea chair by Vittorio Nobili, near which he placed an abandoned bird’s nest he found on the property. Wood panels jigsaw together on the walls. Photo by Karina Tengberg.

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Originally appeared in A Hybrid Prefab Home in Upstate New York
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Walls and ceilings made out of reclaimed butternut wood

“It was a natural choice,” says Adrian Jones of using reclaimed and rescued wood in his Brooklyn renovation. “I didn’t want to chop down a whole lot of trees.” The walls and ceiling are lined with planks of butternut harvested from diseased trees in Vermont. Photo by Kevin Cooley.

Photo by Kevin Cooley.

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