Tree House Retreat Made of Repurposed Materials

written by:
July 30, 2014
An artist crafts a sustainable tree house in the Puerto Rican tropics as an inventive take on the exhibition space. Read Full Article
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  Radamés “Juni” Figueroa lived in his art project tree house, made from found materials, for two fortnights, as part of his artist residency at La Practica at Beta-Local. "The Practice" is an interdisciplinary program of research and production focusing on art, architecture, and design, with an emphasis on collaboration.   Courtesy of: Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

    Radamés “Juni” Figueroa lived in his art project tree house, made from found materials, for two fortnights, as part of his artist residency at La Practica at Beta-Local. "The Practice" is an interdisciplinary program of research and production focusing on art, architecture, and design, with an emphasis on collaboration. 

    Courtesy of: Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

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  The tree house is built around a tree, which also serves as a support for the laddered entrance.   Courtesy of: Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

    The tree house is built around a tree, which also serves as a support for the laddered entrance. 

    Courtesy of: Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

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  A circular window is placed in the tree house's partial wall to further enhance the structure's relationship with its tropical surroundings.  Courtesy of: Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

    A circular window is placed in the tree house's partial wall to further enhance the structure's relationship with its tropical surroundings.

    Courtesy of: Radamés “Juni” Figueroa

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  The artist's iteration of the club for the Whitney Biennial this spring echoes the courtyard's geometry, but defies its austerity with a bohemian interior. The words "break the ice" glow in neon. A table with refreshments is flanked by Marcel Breuer Cesca chairs.   Courtesy of: Sheldan C. Collins/Whitney Museum of Art

    The artist's iteration of the club for the Whitney Biennial this spring echoes the courtyard's geometry, but defies its austerity with a bohemian interior. The words "break the ice" glow in neon. A table with refreshments is flanked by Marcel Breuer Cesca chairs. 

    Courtesy of: Sheldan C. Collins/Whitney Museum of Art

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  Vents on the side let in light and cool air, also providing a place to let clothes hang to dry. Plexiglass skylights are surrounded by potted plants, a few of which grow in the artist's "readymade" planters—constructed of a soccer ball and basketball.  Courtesy of: Bill Orcutt/Whitney Museum of Art

    Vents on the side let in light and cool air, also providing a place to let clothes hang to dry. Plexiglass skylights are surrounded by potted plants, a few of which grow in the artist's "readymade" planters—constructed of a soccer ball and basketball.

    Courtesy of: Bill Orcutt/Whitney Museum of Art

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