Sustainable Single-Family Homes in Cambodia

written by:
May 13, 2014
Three sustainably designed dwellings in Phnom Penh show how far two grand can go. Read Full Article
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  Wet + Dry House by Visionary Design Development Pty. Ltd.Created as part of a contest to design sustainable, low-income housing for Cambodians, the Wet + Dry house was constructed with the idea of a multi-stage response to flooding in mind. Set at different heights, the structure allows for more sustained use.Photo provided by Building Trust International

    Wet + Dry House by Visionary Design Development Pty. Ltd.

    Created as part of a contest to design sustainable, low-income housing for Cambodians, the Wet + Dry house was constructed with the idea of a multi-stage response to flooding in mind. Set at different heights, the structure allows for more sustained use.

    Photo provided by Building Trust International

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  Wet + Dry House by Visionary Design Development Pty. Ltd.“We hope the design of the Wet + Dry House can, in some small way, empower its residents socially and economically,” says designer Mary Ann Jackson. “The porch keeps the sense of community alive by symbolically opening the home to neighbors.”Photo provided by Building Trust International

    Wet + Dry House by Visionary Design Development Pty. Ltd.

    “We hope the design of the Wet + Dry House can, in some small way, empower its residents socially and economically,” says designer Mary Ann Jackson. “The porch keeps the sense of community alive by symbolically opening the home to neighbors.”

    Photo provided by Building Trust International

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  Open Embrace by Keith Greenwald and Lisa EkleThe living quarters, set on clay brick piers, embraces the cyclical nature of the local climate, protecting against floods while opening up space to socialize in the dry season. The corrugated zinc roof, indented slightly to let in natural sunlight and the occasional breeze, not only reduces heat gain, but captures rainwater in cisterns.Photo provided by Building Trust International

    Open Embrace by Keith Greenwald and Lisa Ekle

    The living quarters, set on clay brick piers, embraces the cyclical nature of the local climate, protecting against floods while opening up space to socialize in the dry season. The corrugated zinc roof, indented slightly to let in natural sunlight and the occasional breeze, not only reduces heat gain, but captures rainwater in cisterns.

    Photo provided by Building Trust International

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  Open Embrace by Keith Greenwald and Lisa Ekle“The materials of the house are familiar and largely produced locally, stimulating economies and connecting communities,” says Greenwald.Photo provided by Building Trust International

    Open Embrace by Keith Greenwald and Lisa Ekle

    “The materials of the house are familiar and largely produced locally, stimulating economies and connecting communities,” says Greenwald.

    Photo provided by Building Trust International

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  Courtyard House by Jess Lumley and Alexander KollerSimplicity ruled for the English design team. They referenced and recast traditional elements, such as a brick wall, timber posts, and palm leaf matting and bamboo shutters, which created playful patterns of light.Photo provided by Building Trust International

    Courtyard House by Jess Lumley and Alexander Koller

    Simplicity ruled for the English design team. They referenced and recast traditional elements, such as a brick wall, timber posts, and palm leaf matting and bamboo shutters, which created playful patterns of light.

    Photo provided by Building Trust International

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  Courtyard House by Jess Lumley and Alexander KollerThe bridged courtyard connects the upper spaces of the house, separates the cooking and washing areas, serves as a natural clothesline and provides ventilation and breathing room on a confined (5-by-12-meter) plot.Photo provided by Building Trust International

    Courtyard House by Jess Lumley and Alexander Koller

    The bridged courtyard connects the upper spaces of the house, separates the cooking and washing areas, serves as a natural clothesline and provides ventilation and breathing room on a confined (5-by-12-meter) plot.

    Photo provided by Building Trust International

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