Sustainable Retirement Home in Tune with California Landscape

written by:
photos by:
March 5, 2014
Originally published in The Great Outdoors
as
Air Chrysalis
Read Full Article
  • 
  "Pulling the buildings apart allows what is not a big house to feel really big," says architect Jonathan Feldman of the sustainable retirement home he built for a couple in California. "Because of the ways it opens up, it feels much more expansive than it really is."
    "Pulling the buildings apart allows what is not a big house to feel really big," says architect Jonathan Feldman of the sustainable retirement home he built for a couple in California. "Because of the ways it opens up, it feels much more expansive than it really is."
  • 
  Butterfly House, designed by Feldman Architecture for David and Suzanne Rinaldo in California’s Monterey County, is made up of three discrete structures separated by walkways. The distinct folds in the roofs are utilized for rainwater catchment.
    Butterfly House, designed by Feldman Architecture for David and Suzanne Rinaldo in California’s Monterey County, is made up of three discrete structures separated by walkways. The distinct folds in the roofs are utilized for rainwater catchment.
  • 
  Set on five acres, the three pavilions total 2,900 square feet. They gently fan out in a semicircle “like the charms on a necklace,” Suzanne says. The pair recruited landscape designer Bernard Trainor to help integrate the house with the land.
    Set on five acres, the three pavilions total 2,900 square feet. They gently fan out in a semicircle “like the charms on a necklace,” Suzanne says. The pair recruited landscape designer Bernard Trainor to help integrate the house with the land.
  • 
  Trainor planted native grasses and yarrow as a visual buffer between the house and the natural site. Feldman chose Douglas fir beams as the board forms for the site-poured concrete walls. “The rough texture of the concrete helps tie the house to this dynamic and wild setting,” he says.
    Trainor planted native grasses and yarrow as a visual buffer between the house and the natural site. Feldman chose Douglas fir beams as the board forms for the site-poured concrete walls. “The rough texture of the concrete helps tie the house to this dynamic and wild setting,” he says.
  • 
  The entrance to the main pavilion is defined by a pivoting glass door from Fleetwood (above left). The stairs lead to the media loft, where Inga Sempé’s Ruché sofa for Ligne Roset breaks up the gray. Among the couple’s few directives were tall ceilings, which Feldman covered in low-cost plywood sheets.
    The entrance to the main pavilion is defined by a pivoting glass door from Fleetwood (above left). The stairs lead to the media loft, where Inga Sempé’s Ruché sofa for Ligne Roset breaks up the gray. Among the couple’s few directives were tall ceilings, which Feldman covered in low-cost plywood sheets.
  • 
  In the open living-dining area, a sofa by Antonio Citterio joins a Metropolitan chair and ottoman, all from B&B Italia. A Big Bang fixture from Foscarini hangs above the dining room table, designed by Feldman and surrounded by chairs from Ligne Roset.
    In the open living-dining area, a sofa by Antonio Citterio joins a Metropolitan chair and ottoman, all from B&B Italia. A Big Bang fixture from Foscarini hangs above the dining room table, designed by Feldman and surrounded by chairs from Ligne Roset.
  • 
  The bathroom in the guest pavilion takes advantage of the passive solar siting. “Detaching the roof from the walls allowed us to bring in light from the top,” notes the architect. The custom vanity holds a Lacava sink; the tub is AquaStone from Aquatica.
    The bathroom in the guest pavilion takes advantage of the passive solar siting. “Detaching the roof from the walls allowed us to bring in light from the top,” notes the architect. The custom vanity holds a Lacava sink; the tub is AquaStone from Aquatica.
  • 
  More native grasses set the tone near the generously sized concrete pavers leading to the entrance. “We didn’t want the planting to feel like a country cottage garden—that would have felt disconnected with the view behind it,” Trainor says.
    More native grasses set the tone near the generously sized concrete pavers leading to the entrance. “We didn’t want the planting to feel like a country cottage garden—that would have felt disconnected with the view behind it,” Trainor says.
  • 
  The bedroom pavilion is mostly hidden, thanks to a massive native California oak—part of a grove. “That’s the good thing about oaks—they keep their leaves in the winter, so you don’t have one view in the summer and another in the winter,” Suzanne says.
    The bedroom pavilion is mostly hidden, thanks to a massive native California oak—part of a grove. “That’s the good thing about oaks—they keep their leaves in the winter, so you don’t have one view in the summer and another in the winter,” Suzanne says.
  • 
  Butterfly House Floor Plan
A	Entrance
B	Dining Room
C	Living Room
D	Kitchen
E	Bathroom
F	Master Bedroom
G	Bedroom
H	Office
I	Terrace
J	Garage
K	Cisterns
L	Pavers
    Butterfly House Floor Plan A Entrance B Dining Room C Living Room D Kitchen E Bathroom F Master Bedroom G Bedroom H Office I Terrace J Garage K Cisterns L Pavers
Previous Next
Slideshow loading...
@current / @total
Read Full Article

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...