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A Slender Geothermal Cottage in London

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On an eight-foot-wide site in London, architect Luke Tozer cleverly squeezed in a four-story home equipped with rain-water-harvesting and geothermal systems.
 

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  On an eight-foot-wide site in London, architect Luke Tozer cleverly squeezed in 
a four-story home equipped with rain-water-harvesting and geothermal systems.  Photo by: Charlie Crane
    On an eight-foot-wide site in London, architect Luke Tozer cleverly squeezed in a four-story home equipped with rain-water-harvesting and geothermal systems.

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  The glass walls that separate the living area from the courtyard fully retract to allow a smooth passage between the two.   Photo by: Charlie Crane
    The glass walls that separate the living area from the courtyard fully retract to allow a smooth passage between the two. 

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  The staircase is a bespoke design by Luke Tozer, made of a larch composite sourced from sustainable forestry in Austria. It was made off-site and then assembled in position like a jigsaw puzzle.    Photo by: Charlie Crane
    The staircase is a bespoke design by Luke Tozer, made of a larch composite sourced from sustainable forestry in Austria. It was made off-site and then assembled in position like a jigsaw puzzle.  

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  At the back, the building steps down to the courtyard garden in a ziggurat formation, with the main living spaces on the lowest floor.  Photo by: Charlie Crane
    At the back, the building steps down to the courtyard garden in a ziggurat formation, with the main living spaces on the lowest floor.

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  The glass wall separating the main living area and the inner courtyard garden opens like an accordion to create a barrier-free transition. Built-in planters along the walls of the courtyard add greenery without eating into the valuable surface 
area of the courtyard.   Photo by: Charlie Crane
    The glass wall separating the main living area and the inner courtyard garden opens like an accordion to create a barrier-free transition. Built-in planters along the walls of the courtyard add greenery without eating into the valuable surface area of the courtyard. 

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  The fluid relationship between the open-plan living zone and the garden, enhanced by even floor levels inside and out, helps create a generous feeling of space, despite the challenging constraints of the limited site.  Photo by: Charlie Crane
    The fluid relationship between the open-plan living zone and the garden, enhanced by even floor levels inside and out, helps create a generous feeling of space, despite the challenging constraints of the limited site.

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  Throughout the house, built-in storage and shelving is cleverly positioned in alcoves and recesses, as in the dining area, which allows clutter to be easily cleared away.  Photo by: Charlie Crane
    Throughout the house, built-in storage and shelving is cleverly positioned in alcoves and recesses, as in the dining area, which allows clutter to be easily cleared away.

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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  Luke Tozer invested in a rainwater-harvesting system for the house that meets part of the family’s need for domestic water and is used to flush the four toilets in the house.  Photo by: Charlie Crane
    Luke Tozer invested in a rainwater-harvesting system for the house that meets part of the family’s need for domestic water and is used to flush the four toilets in the house.

    Photo by: Charlie Crane

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