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Simply Sustainable

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Located in a hidden valley on the picturesque Izu Peninsula, a few hours west of Tokyo, the Watanabe Residence, designed by architect Tadashi Murai, looks more like an imposing black box propped amidst the wooded landscape than a model of environmental friendliness.
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  Architect Tadashi Murai designed this remote retreat for a Tokyo transplant who abandoned his corporate existence.  Photo by: Alessio Guarino
    Architect Tadashi Murai designed this remote retreat for a Tokyo transplant who abandoned his corporate existence.

    Photo by: Alessio Guarino

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  In Japan, where the average life span of a building is about 25 years, using basic materials like plywood was essential to Murai’s design.  Photo by: Alessio Guarino
    In Japan, where the average life span of a building is about 25 years, using basic materials like plywood was essential to Murai’s design.

    Photo by: Alessio Guarino

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  The resident, a Tokyo transplant, commissioned architect Tadashi Murai to create a fully-equipped structure that comes with its own power, heating and cooling, water, and waste-disposal systems.  Photo by: Alessio Guarino
    The resident, a Tokyo transplant, commissioned architect Tadashi Murai to create a fully-equipped structure that comes with its own power, heating and cooling, water, and waste-disposal systems.

    Photo by: Alessio Guarino

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  Other configurations of architect Tadashi Murai's modular design.  Photo by: Alessio Guarino
    Other configurations of architect Tadashi Murai's modular design.

    Photo by: Alessio Guarino

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