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Pole Star

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By creatively manipulating the angles and levels of exterior surfaces on this modest Polish country house, architect Peter Kuczia achieved exceptionally high solar exposure, increasing its capacity to gain energy from the sun.

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  The sun shines over the meadow on the backside of Kuczia’s carbon-saving creation, whose central atrium contains the living room. In summer, the glass doors open.
    The sun shines over the meadow on the backside of Kuczia’s carbon-saving creation, whose central atrium contains the living room. In summer, the glass doors open.
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  The main living area of the house is in the larch-wood-clad ground floor. The “black box”—–a three-story structure made from charcoal-colored fiber-cement panels—–contains another living room. The facade absorbs warmth from the sun, preventing heat loss in winter; in warm weather, hot air escapes through the top window.
    The main living area of the house is in the larch-wood-clad ground floor. The “black box”—–a three-story structure made from charcoal-colored fiber-cement panels—–contains another living room. The facade absorbs warmth from the sun, preventing heat loss in winter; in warm weather, hot air escapes through the top window.
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  The garden-ready rooftop can provide additional insulation and soundproofing.
    The garden-ready rooftop can provide additional insulation and soundproofing.

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