Passive Houses Across America

written by:
July 19, 2013
A new book on passive houses by designer Julie Torres Moskovitz highlights the super-green homes of our sustainable present (and future). Read Full Article
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  First things first: What's a Passive House? They're well insulated, virtually airtight buildings who must meet strict energy efficiency requirements. The benefit is that building passive can decrease home heating consumption by an astounding 90% and decrease overall energy consumption up to 75%. Here, a mixed-use building in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with a single-family home atop a retail space, all designed by Loadingdock5. Photo by: Raimund Koch.  Courtesy of: Raimund Koch
    First things first: What's a Passive House? They're well insulated, virtually airtight buildings who must meet strict energy efficiency requirements. The benefit is that building passive can decrease home heating consumption by an astounding 90% and decrease overall energy consumption up to 75%. Here, a mixed-use building in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with a single-family home atop a retail space, all designed by Loadingdock5. Photo by: Raimund Koch.

    Courtesy of: Raimund Koch

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  The interior of an urban passive house by Loadingdock5, located at 174 Grand Street in Brooklyn. Photo by: Raimund Koch.  Courtesy of: Raimund Koch
    The interior of an urban passive house by Loadingdock5, located at 174 Grand Street in Brooklyn. Photo by: Raimund Koch.

    Courtesy of: Raimund Koch

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  Little Compton Retreat in Little Compton, Rhode Island, completed by ZeroEnergy Design in 2011. Photo by: Greg Premru.  Courtesy of: Greg Premru
    Little Compton Retreat in Little Compton, Rhode Island, completed by ZeroEnergy Design in 2011. Photo by: Greg Premru.

    Courtesy of: Greg Premru

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  South-facing windows, bedrooms situated at each end of a simple gabled structure, and a sleeping loft maximize both energy efficiency and an open, airy feeling in this Rhode Island vacation home by ZeroEnergy Design. Photo by: Greg Premru.  Courtesy of: Greg Premru
    South-facing windows, bedrooms situated at each end of a simple gabled structure, and a sleeping loft maximize both energy efficiency and an open, airy feeling in this Rhode Island vacation home by ZeroEnergy Design. Photo by: Greg Premru.

    Courtesy of: Greg Premru

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  Orient House (2012) on Long Island was an existing structure retrofitted by Ryall Porter Sheridan Architects to conform to Passive House green standards.  Courtesy of: Ty Cole

    Orient House (2012) on Long Island was an existing structure retrofitted by Ryall Porter Sheridan Architects to conform to Passive House green standards.

    Courtesy of: Ty Cole

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  An existing 1970s house was renovated to Passive House standards of construction, though the north-facing views and sheets of glass prevented it from meeting true Passive House energy calculations. The architects, Ryall Porter Sheridan, estimate that its "the second most energy-efficient structure on Long Island." Photo by: Ty Cole.  Courtesy of: Ty Cole
    An existing 1970s house was renovated to Passive House standards of construction, though the north-facing views and sheets of glass prevented it from meeting true Passive House energy calculations. The architects, Ryall Porter Sheridan, estimate that its "the second most energy-efficient structure on Long Island." Photo by: Ty Cole.

    Courtesy of: Ty Cole

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  The Greenest Home by Julie Torres Moskovitz is out now from Princeton Architectural Press; buy it on Amazon here.  Courtesy of: Princeton Architectural Press
    The Greenest Home by Julie Torres Moskovitz is out now from Princeton Architectural Press; buy it on Amazon here.

    Courtesy of: Princeton Architectural Press

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