A Lot to Love

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photos by:
February 12, 2010

In a leafy residential area a few miles from downtown Kansas City, Missouri, an enterprising architect saw opportunity where others saw trouble. He took a sloping, triangular lot and designed a new home for his growing family—an open, tree house–like structure on stilts that hovers at the quirky edge of a conventional neighborhood.

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  The Arnolds’ bedroom and living area float over the hillside, the large windows allowing light to flood in from both sides. A bamboo-enclosed deck sits atop the house’s foundation.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    The Arnolds’ bedroom and living area float over the hillside, the large windows allowing light to flood in from both sides. A bamboo-enclosed deck sits atop the house’s foundation.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

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  The entry bridge leading to the front door was made from timber salvaged from Christian’s parents’ farm near Kingman, Kansas.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    The entry bridge leading to the front door was made from timber salvaged from Christian’s parents’ farm near Kingman, Kansas.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

  • 
  Christian and Jack play chess by the fireplace - the centerpiece of the living room and which the Arnolds use daily during the winter. The hearth is made of large slabs 
of limestone, which Christian cut himself, intentionally leaving imperfections on the surface for texture. A studio8 couch and Vitra Tom Vac Rocker articulate the space.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    Christian and Jack play chess by the fireplace - the centerpiece of the living room and which the Arnolds use daily during the winter. The hearth is made of large slabs of limestone, which Christian cut himself, intentionally leaving imperfections on the surface for texture. A studio8 couch and Vitra Tom Vac Rocker articulate the space.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

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  The dining table was made from reclaimed pine that Julie refinished with layers of stain and wax. Julie also made the lamps, using Knoll textiles.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    The dining table was made from reclaimed pine that Julie refinished with layers of stain and wax. Julie also made the lamps, using Knoll textiles.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

  • 
  The Duravit tub in the master bathroom is another favorite spot for keeping warm; it offers a slender view out toward the trees.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    The Duravit tub in the master bathroom is another favorite spot for keeping warm; it offers a slender view out toward the trees.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

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  In the kids’ room, Jack climbs the bunk bed he shares with his little brother, James. The paintings on the wall were done by their mom.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    In the kids’ room, Jack climbs the bunk bed he shares with his little brother, James. The paintings on the wall were done by their mom.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

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  Julie, James, and Christian enjoy an unexpected bonus of living in a house on stilts—–a pair of swings suspended from the base of the structure. The family often goes for walks on the property, looking for wildlife and playing in the tepee they built in a secluded space in the woods.  Photo by: Mike SinclairCourtesy of: Mike Sinclair
    Julie, James, and Christian enjoy an unexpected bonus of living in a house on stilts—–a pair of swings suspended from the base of the structure. The family often goes for walks on the property, looking for wildlife and playing in the tepee they built in a secluded space in the woods.

    Photo by: Mike Sinclair

    Courtesy of: Mike Sinclair

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