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In the Loop

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Adrian Jones lived in his top-floor loft in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood for nine years before renovating. For a bachelor set designer, the 2,500-square-foot space was perfect: plenty of room for his studio and collections of books and art, big windows affording city views, and exposed brick tagged with graffiti.

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  Adrian Jones and Allison Silverman sit at their reclaimed wood dining table. Eco-mindedness is a matter-of-fact part of everyday life for the couple and the designer, Garrick Jones. “Sustainability comes from flexibility and planning for the long term,” Garrick says. “This is not a glammed-up loft.”  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    Adrian Jones and Allison Silverman sit at their reclaimed wood dining table. Eco-mindedness is a matter-of-fact part of everyday life for the couple and the designer, Garrick Jones. “Sustainability comes from flexibility and planning for the long term,” Garrick says. “This is not a glammed-up loft.” Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  When the door to the deck is open, air flows unhindered from the kitchen to the living room. Garrick expanded the radiant heating and added a high-efficiency Fujitsu Halcyon ductless forced-air system for cooling.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    When the door to the deck is open, air flows unhindered from the kitchen to the living room. Garrick expanded the radiant heating and added a high-efficiency Fujitsu Halcyon ductless forced-air system for cooling. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  The radiant-heating system's pipes and gauges hide in a closet.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    The radiant-heating system's pipes and gauges hide in a closet. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  The forced air unit's slim design lets it disappear on the office's top shelf.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    The forced air unit's slim design lets it disappear on the office's top shelf. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  “It was a natural choice,” says Adrian of using reclaimed and rescued wood. “I didn’t want to chop down a whole lot of trees.” The walls and ceiling are lined with planks of butternut harvested from diseased trees in Vermont.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    “It was a natural choice,” says Adrian of using reclaimed and rescued wood. “I didn’t want to chop down a whole lot of trees.” The walls and ceiling are lined with planks of butternut harvested from diseased trees in Vermont. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  Using lumber milled from dead and diseased wood gives a second life to blighted forests, and the worm infestations result in beautiful hole patterns in the timber.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    Using lumber milled from dead and diseased wood gives a second life to blighted forests, and the worm infestations result in beautiful hole patterns in the timber. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  Inspired by a photograph he spotted on how-to website Instructables and an idea from Adrian, Contractor Halit Dervishaj upcycled the scrap lumber into a large dining-room table, laminating together butternut, oak, and Plyboo for the tabletop and adding a simple metal base with legs that Adrian ordered online.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    Inspired by a photograph he spotted on how-to website Instructables and an idea from Adrian, Contractor Halit Dervishaj upcycled the scrap lumber into a large dining-room table, laminating together butternut, oak, and Plyboo for the tabletop and adding a simple metal base with legs that Adrian ordered online. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  Adrian wanted to bring a theatrical glow to the loft without using recessed lights or cluttering up the space with lamps. He consulted lighting designer and friend Paul Whitaker and found that linear LED covelights could provide low-wattage illumination with little maintenance.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    Adrian wanted to bring a theatrical glow to the loft without using recessed lights or cluttering up the space with lamps. He consulted lighting designer and friend Paul Whitaker and found that linear LED covelights could provide low-wattage illumination with little maintenance. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  The resawn oak flooring comes from structural beams salvaged from a barn in Ohio’s Allegheny Mountains that dated back to the 1800s. The doors were salvaged from a mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut.  Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    The resawn oak flooring comes from structural beams salvaged from a barn in Ohio’s Allegheny Mountains that dated back to the 1800s. The doors were salvaged from a mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut. Photo by Kevin Cooley.
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  The plan of the Jones / Silverman residence.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!   Photo by Kevin Cooley.
    The plan of the Jones / Silverman residence.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

    Photo by Kevin Cooley.

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