Long Division

written by:
January 25, 2009
Originally published in The New American Home
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  The house's angled placement on the site, as well as its narrow footprint, provide effortless cross ventilation and abundant natural sunlight.
    The house's angled placement on the site, as well as its narrow footprint, provide effortless cross ventilation and abundant natural sunlight.
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  The long corridor between the guest and main quarters provides ample light and lovely views in addition to acting as one of the Longhouse's most hard-working green elements. The concrete Trombe wall collects sunlight and distributes it as heat throughout the home.
    The long corridor between the guest and main quarters provides ample light and lovely views in addition to acting as one of the Longhouse's most hard-working green elements. The concrete Trombe wall collects sunlight and distributes it as heat throughout the home.
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  Ted Preston takes charge of hot beverages in the kitchen. The architects diligently avoided cold, hard minimalism with a honey-tinged Italian poplar ceiling.
    Ted Preston takes charge of hot beverages in the kitchen. The architects diligently avoided cold, hard minimalism with a honey-tinged Italian poplar ceiling.
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  The courtyard facing Anne Cornege is sheltered from the Wairarapa winds year-round.
    The courtyard facing Anne Cornege is sheltered from the Wairarapa winds year-round.
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  Sun shines through the glass and onto the concrete, heat-storing wall and floor in the hallway that separates the guestrooms from the main house. This “heat sink” keeps the Longhouse warm when the mercury dips.
    Sun shines through the glass and onto the concrete, heat-storing wall and floor in the hallway that separates the guestrooms from the main house. This “heat sink” keeps the Longhouse warm when the mercury dips.
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