A Fine Vintage

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September 15, 2010

At age 34, Philip M. Isaacson commissioned architect F. Frederick Bruck to design a home for him and his wife. That was 1959. Five decades later, he still lives 
in his ideal home—and very little has changed.

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  At age 34, Phillip M. Isaacson commissioned architect F.Frederick Bruck to design a home for him and his wife. That was 1959. Five decades later, he still lives in his ideal home--and very little has changed.  Photo by: Eric RothCourtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth
    At age 34, Phillip M. Isaacson commissioned architect F.Frederick Bruck to design a home for him and his wife. That was 1959. Five decades later, he still lives in his ideal home--and very little has changed.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth

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  The main entry, located off the front courtyard is more practical than grand. The door opens onto a PK15 chair by Poul Kjaerholm and built-in coat cabinets that direct movement to either side of the hall and into the living area.  Photo by: Eric Roth
    The main entry, located off the front courtyard is more practical than grand. The door opens onto a PK15 chair by Poul Kjaerholm and built-in coat cabinets that direct movement to either side of the hall and into the living area.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

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  The library is lit by the front courtyard. The chartreuse vent, originally painted vermilion, is the one architectural color inside the house. Two Cantilever Cane chairs by Mies van der Rohe face Isaacson as he rests upon a Pernilla easy chair by Bruno Mathsson.  Photo by: Eric Roth
    The library is lit by the front courtyard. The chartreuse vent, originally painted vermilion, is the one architectural color inside the house. Two Cantilever Cane chairs by Mies van der Rohe face Isaacson as he rests upon a Pernilla easy chair by Bruno Mathsson.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

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  A club from the Fiji islands is mounted on the wall of the fireplace that divides the living and dining rooms. The dining room—furnished with two Cab chairs by Mario Bellini for Cassina, a pair of Cowhorn chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Johannes Hansen, the Barcelona Table by Mies van der Rohe for Knoll, and a Y61 stool by Alvar Aalto for Artek—has no windows, but lightwells on either side of the chimney provide brightness. Another design by Wegner, the Chair, peeks out from the dining room.  Photo by: Eric Roth
    A club from the Fiji islands is mounted on the wall of the fireplace that divides the living and dining rooms. The dining room—furnished with two Cab chairs by Mario Bellini for Cassina, a pair of Cowhorn chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Johannes Hansen, the Barcelona Table by Mies van der Rohe for Knoll, and a Y61 stool by Alvar Aalto for Artek—has no windows, but lightwells on either side of the chimney provide brightness. Another design by Wegner, the Chair, peeks out from the dining room.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

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  Isaacson and his best friend, Mary T. Hatch, snack at a dining table by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller in the eat-in kitchen.  Photo by: Eric RothCourtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth
    Isaacson and his best friend, Mary T. Hatch, snack at a dining table by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller in the eat-in kitchen.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth

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  Isaacson "borrows the view" of a neighbor's magnolia on the adjacent property by propping open the side door. His own espaliered apple tree makes the most of limited space.  Photo by: Eric RothCourtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth
    Isaacson "borrows the view" of a neighbor's magnolia on the adjacent property by propping open the side door. His own espaliered apple tree makes the most of limited space.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth

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  Isaacson designed the steel door handle and had it milled by local machinists in Lewiston.  Photo by: Eric RothCourtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth
    Isaacson designed the steel door handle and had it milled by local machinists in Lewiston.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 by Eric Roth

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  The second bedroom has an eclectic mix of textiles and textures: replicas of the original curtains, a custom wood credenza by Gerald Curry, a bright pillow made by a friend, bed linens from Finland, and a rug from Morocco.  Photo by: Eric Roth
    The second bedroom has an eclectic mix of textiles and textures: replicas of the original curtains, a custom wood credenza by Gerald Curry, a bright pillow made by a friend, bed linens from Finland, and a rug from Morocco.

    Photo by: Eric Roth

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