Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Escape to the Rock

+ Read Article

Off the coast of British Columbia—on a site accessible only by boat—a family of Vancouver urbanites commissioned a sustainable cabin for weekend getaways that feels a world away.

  • 
  Perched over a cliff face, the hooded deck of the Gambier Residence reads like a ship’s prow over Howe Sound, the scenic waters near Vancouver.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    Perched over a cliff face, the hooded deck of the Gambier Residence reads like a ship’s prow over Howe Sound, the scenic waters near Vancouver. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  The facade is clad with beveled siding, stained dark to meld into the forest.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    The facade is clad with beveled siding, stained dark to meld into the forest. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  The architects designed every gesture of the home as a complement to the landscape, including the slot windows that frame views of the surrounding foliage and the walkway that follows the bedrock of the cliff.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    The architects designed every gesture of the home as a complement to the landscape, including the slot windows that frame views of the surrounding foliage and the walkway that follows the bedrock of the cliff. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  Farther down on the site is a dock whose ramp is lowered by hand via weight-laden pulleys. The residence is accessible by private boat or water taxi only.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    Farther down on the site is a dock whose ramp is lowered by hand via weight-laden pulleys. The residence is accessible by private boat or water taxi only. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  Lam and her son Max prepare a snack together in the open-plan kitchen at the center of the house. The fir floor that covers the living space steps downward twice, creating a grade change that roughly follows the topology of the site. The ceiling is sheathed in untreated hemlock; the custom stools were designed by Brent Comber.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    Lam and her son Max prepare a snack together in the open-plan kitchen at the center of the house. The fir floor that covers the living space steps downward twice, creating a grade change that roughly follows the topology of the site. The ceiling is sheathed in untreated hemlock; the custom stools were designed by Brent Comber. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  The plan of the house revolves around a rocky outcropping lush with life that acts as the home’s central atrium. The granite was left intact in order to serve as the nucleus of the courtyard, and the walls of windows draw a wealth of natural daylight into the back of the building.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    The plan of the house revolves around a rocky outcropping lush with life that acts as the home’s central atrium. The granite was left intact in order to serve as the nucleus of the courtyard, and the walls of windows draw a wealth of natural daylight into the back of the building. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  Down on the cedar dock, the view of nearby Bowen Island generates a dramatic foreground view, while the British Columbia mainland in the distance appears to be 
a world away.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    Down on the cedar dock, the view of nearby Bowen Island generates a dramatic foreground view, while the British Columbia mainland in the distance appears to be 
a world away. Photo by Misha Gravenor.
  • 
  The cantilevered main floor creates space for bracken fern and other indigenous 
vegetation to flourish.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    The cantilevered main floor creates space for bracken fern and other indigenous 
vegetation to flourish. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

@current / @total

More

Add comment

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
Advertising
Close
Try Dwell Risk-Free!
Yes! Send me a RISK-FREE issue of Dwell. If I like it I'll pay only $14.95 for one year (10 issues in all).