written by:
photos by:
November 4, 2009
Originally published in Urban Revival

Fifteen minutes from downtown Seattle, architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo transformed the neighborhood dump—a lot that had been vacant for 30 years—into their dream home.

To stay within budget, Han and Mihalyo spent seven months and all of their free time building the house. As a result, the couple is well-acquainted with every square inch of their home. As Han says, “If there’s a nail in the wall, we know exactly what’s b
To stay within budget, Han and Mihalyo spent seven months and all of their free time building the house. As a result, the couple is well-acquainted with every square inch of their home. As Han says, “If there’s a nail in the wall, we know exactly what’s behind it.”
Photo by 
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The kitchen countertops are covered in a thicker version of the same mild steel that clads the house and coated with beeswax to protect from scratches and stains.
The kitchen countertops are covered in a thicker version of the same mild steel that clads the house and coated with beeswax to protect from scratches and stains.
Photo by 
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All of the plywood, concrete, and steel surfaces inside the house were left unfinished. “We like to use natural materials in their raw state and minimize the use of synthetic surfaces and drywall,” says Mihalyo.
All of the plywood, concrete, and steel surfaces inside the house were left unfinished. “We like to use natural materials in their raw state and minimize the use of synthetic surfaces and drywall,” says Mihalyo.
Photo by 
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Even in ever-gray and gloomy Seattle, the 24-by-10-foot front window lets in enough light that the couple rarely needs to turn on any lamps inside the house.
Even in ever-gray and gloomy Seattle, the 24-by-10-foot front window lets in enough light that the couple rarely needs to turn on any lamps inside the house.
Photo by 
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Sheets of hot-rolled steel were used as exterior cladding—as well as for parts of walls and countertops indoors—to heighten the industrial effect. “When hot-rolled steel comes out of the factory, it’s a very even-toned, blue-gray color,” Han says. “But we
Sheets of hot-rolled steel were used as exterior cladding—as well as for parts of walls and countertops indoors—to heighten the industrial effect. “When hot-rolled steel comes out of the factory, it’s a very even-toned, blue-gray color,” Han says. “But we wanted to have a pattern. So we stacked the sheets of siding outside in the rain, and let it sit there so that the water would create texture.” Putting up the siding was messy, since each sheet had to be carefully dried before installation and then covered with a water-based clear coat to prevent surface oxidation. The result, though, is a quietly mottled surface that Mihalyo says “looks like slate” and will change color over time as dark brown tones begin to appear beneath the basic steel gray. Like the circular windows that seem stolen from the airplanes flying over the house, the steel siding is an architectural element made possible on a small budget only by Han and Mihalyo doing it themselves. As Han exclaims, “Can you imagine specing this out for a contractor?” ­
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“There’s nothing fancy about it,” explains Mihalyo of how the south-facing second-story window helps to both cool and heat the house. “It’s just good placement of the window with a canopy over it.”
“There’s nothing fancy about it,” explains Mihalyo of how the south-facing second-story window helps to both cool and heat the house. “It’s just good placement of the window with a canopy over it.”
Photo by 
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To stay within budget, Han and Mihalyo spent seven months and all of their free time building the house. As a result, the couple is well-acquainted with every square inch of their home. As Han says, “If there’s a nail in the wall, we know exactly what’s b
To stay within budget, Han and Mihalyo spent seven months and all of their free time building the house. As a result, the couple is well-acquainted with every square inch of their home. As Han says, “If there’s a nail in the wall, we know exactly what’s behind it.”
Project 
Han / Mihalyo Residence
Architect 

Amidst a tangle of blackberry bushes and decaying tires, architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio saw the perfect site for their future home. “The lot was vacant for 30 years and was kind of the neighborhood dump,” Mihalyo explains of the small space a mere 15-minute walk from downtown Seattle. “There were several cars’ worth of car parts and 25 or so pickup-truck loads of debris that we had to haul off the lot. Just clearing away all the stuff that was sitting on the land took us about a month.”

The kitchen countertops are covered in a thicker version of the same mild steel that clads the house and coated with beeswax to protect from scratches and stains.
The kitchen countertops are covered in a thicker version of the same mild steel that clads the house and coated with beeswax to protect from scratches and stains.

This exercise in manual labor—rare for most architects, who supervise projects and don’t usually wield hammers or drive Bobcats—became an everyday task for the couple. With a materials and construction budget of just $70,000, Han and Mihalyo did all the design and almost all the building themselves, since they couldn’t afford to hire extra hands.

Despite their financial constraints, the architects seamlessly incorporated sustainable building design into their dwelling, disproving the stereotype that environmentally conscious materials are costly or complex to use. “Most of the things we did are simple, low-cost additions to what we would have done anyway. They’re doable on nearly any structure,” says Mihalyo of the couple’s matter-of-fact approach to green architecture. “It’s like buying organic fruit. If there are two apples sitting side by side and one’s organic and one’s not, you buy the organic apple unless it’s much more expensive,” Han explains.

Even in ever-gray and gloomy Seattle, the 24-by-10-foot front window lets in enough light that the couple rarely needs to turn on any lamps inside the house.
Even in ever-gray and gloomy Seattle, the 24-by-10-foot front window lets in enough light that the couple rarely needs to turn on any lamps inside the house.

Their house—1,350 square feet that combine the couple’s architecture and sculpture studio with their living space—is a box of unfinished wood, steel, and concrete. The couple had wanted to live in an industrial-type space, but when they were unable to find a building to renovate in their price range they simply transplanted their sustainable urban ideal into a quiet residential neighborhood within view of downtown high-rises.

The bottom level of the home is poured concrete mixed with 30 percent fly ash (a waste product), a com­bination that both increases strength (you can do more  with less) of the concrete and decreases harmful emissions. The 15-foot-tall walls were built with the help of a small company of five friendly and strong Tongan brothers—the couple’s one financial indulgence in their cost-cutting regime of self-build. Wood-framed walls comprise the second story, clad with sheets of recyclable hot-rolled steel (see sidebar).

Inside the open, loftlike space, the temperature is kept comfortable year-round through energy-efficient solutions. “Compared with our neighbors’, our energy bill is puny,” boasts Mihalyo. Thick walls densely packed with fiberglass batting provide excellent insulation, and a radiant heating system under the cement first floor keeps the place warm. The walls, roof, and floor are insulated
at twice the value required by code. On the second floor, the architects designed a 5-by-20-foot south-facing passive solar window with a canopy for shade, providing heat in the winter and a cooling effect in the summer.

Plundering the local salvage yards provided most of the doors, sinks, and bathtubs in the home. The old cast-iron tub upstairs and a pair of old working double doors at the entrance give the house “a mark of history that you can’t fake with new materials,” says Han. As a nod to the local airplane-manufacturing industry, aluminum sheeting scrounged from Boeing surplus was used for the solar canopy and covers the roof deck.

And those neighbors who used their yard as a dumping ground? “While we were doing the work hauling stuff away, the neighbors walked by sheepishly waving at us as they saw the tires they threw out,” Han says. “But everyone has been really supportive and happy that we did something with this empty lot that was an eyesore,” Mihalyo interjects. And as it turns out, the couple still helps haul away trash—the neighbors often borrow their ’67 Chevy pickup for trips to the dump.

 

To see more images of the project, please visit the slideshow.

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