8 Products for Indoor and Urban Gardening

written by:
June 12, 2014
At this point in the planting season, your friends and neighbors may already have neatly arranged rows of starter plants in their backyard, or pots on their balcony starting to sprout CSA-worthy veggies. But even if your apartment is bare thus far, that doesn’t mean there aren’t easy ways for you to get a little green in your life. Dwell found an array of products and planters perfect for urban living, small spaces, and indoor growing.
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  Bulbo Quadra and Cynara
Part of the movement to utilize LED lights to popularize and expand indoor farming, Bulbo adds a touch of Italian panache to your indoor soil-and-seed endeavors. The unobtrusive design and light footprint—the Cynara, pictured above, looks like a small, overturned pot—make them easy to use in a variety of situations. 
Photo by Ottavio Montanari
    Bulbo Quadra and Cynara

    Part of the movement to utilize LED lights to popularize and expand indoor farming, Bulbo adds a touch of Italian panache to your indoor soil-and-seed endeavors. The unobtrusive design and light footprint—the Cynara, pictured above, looks like a small, overturned pot—make them easy to use in a variety of situations.

    Photo by Ottavio Montanari

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  Pikaplant and Pikaplant One
Water is free, but your time isn’t. If you’ve suffered through the guilt of letting houseplants brown and yellow due to lack of attention, the Dutch company Pikaplant has two products that do almost all of the work for you. The glass-and-steel Pikaplant One shelf is designed with a passive watering system that only requires a occasional fill-up, and the Pikaplant Jars are all-in-one terrariums for the watering deficient. Unless you’re clumsy enough to knock it down, you’re set.
    Pikaplant and Pikaplant One

    Water is free, but your time isn’t. If you’ve suffered through the guilt of letting houseplants brown and yellow due to lack of attention, the Dutch company Pikaplant has two products that do almost all of the work for you. The glass-and-steel Pikaplant One shelf is designed with a passive watering system that only requires a occasional fill-up, and the Pikaplant Jars are all-in-one terrariums for the watering deficient. Unless you’re clumsy enough to knock it down, you’re set.

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  Bocci 38 Lamps
Inside a former biscuit factory in Vancouver, the artisans at Bocci have been shaping and manipulating glass for nearly a decade, fashioning incredibly ornate lighting solutions. The new 38 Lamps boast organic curves and cavities that are ideal for growing plants and flowers of a similarly delicate nature. 
Photo by Spencer Hung
    Bocci 38 Lamps

    Inside a former biscuit factory in Vancouver, the artisans at Bocci have been shaping and manipulating glass for nearly a decade, fashioning incredibly ornate lighting solutions. The new 38 Lamps boast organic curves and cavities that are ideal for growing plants and flowers of a similarly delicate nature.

    Photo by Spencer Hung

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  Click and GrowBack-to-the-land types may decry the Click and Grow, a sleek Scandinavian-designed assemblage of  microchips and NASA-inspired Smart Soil that can help grow plants and herbs indoors all year round. That’s OK, though; when you’re enjoying fresh basil or berries in the middle of the winter, they can go outside and try to forage some root vegetables. 
Photo by Andres Keil

    Click and Grow

    Back-to-the-land types may decry the Click and Grow, a sleek Scandinavian-designed assemblage of microchips and NASA-inspired Smart Soil that can help grow plants and herbs indoors all year round. That’s OK, though; when you’re enjoying fresh basil or berries in the middle of the winter, they can go outside and try to forage some root vegetables.

    Photo by Andres Keil

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  Urban CultivatorA dishwasher-sized micro-garden that appears to be a wine rack for plants, the Urban Cultivator looks poised to slide into pre-existing kitchen designs, an easy way to add a drawer of fresh herbs to your home.

    Urban Cultivator

    A dishwasher-sized micro-garden that appears to be a wine rack for plants, the Urban Cultivator looks poised to slide into pre-existing kitchen designs, an easy way to add a drawer of fresh herbs to your home.

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  Urban Green HousePerhaps answering the question of what actually gets greens from farm to table, Danish designer Line Grüner’s mobile garden isn’t merely growing space on wheels. With seating and space the spread out, it’s could become a green escape pod.

    Urban Green House

    Perhaps answering the question of what actually gets greens from farm to table, Danish designer Line Grüner’s mobile garden isn’t merely growing space on wheels. With seating and space the spread out, it’s could become a green escape pod.

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  ApiariumDesign student Bettina Madita Boehm designed this gorgeous, cylindrical concrete bee hive, with a honeycombed inner ring, as part of her thesis at the Free University of Bologna. She's seeking a partner to help produce her product, but if it gtes made, and the declining bee population likes good design, we may be able to prevent the beepocolypse.

    Apiarium

    Design student Bettina Madita Boehm designed this gorgeous, cylindrical concrete bee hive, with a honeycombed inner ring, as part of her thesis at the Free University of Bologna. She's seeking a partner to help produce her product, but if it gtes made, and the declining bee population likes good design, we may be able to prevent the beepocolypse.

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  Green Towers Living Furniture
It's a clean, controlled circle of life that actually looks good in your living room. A fusion of aquaponics and hydroponics, the Living Table utilizes fish waste to organically fertilize plants, which in turn clean and filter the water. A group of Penn State students working in College Station, Pennsylvania, designed the table, which they plan to launch via Kickstarter on June 30th.
    Green Towers Living Furniture

    It's a clean, controlled circle of life that actually looks good in your living room. A fusion of aquaponics and hydroponics, the Living Table utilizes fish waste to organically fertilize plants, which in turn clean and filter the water. A group of Penn State students working in College Station, Pennsylvania, designed the table, which they plan to launch via Kickstarter on June 30th.

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