5 More Sustainable Homes

written by:
June 17, 2013
It ain’t easy being green, but it’s worth the extra effort. Here, we share five sustainable homes that don’t skimp on design.
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  The Longhouse in Martinborough, New Zealand, has a narrow footprint and an angled site placement to provide loads of natural light and cross-ventilation. 

    The Longhouse in Martinborough, New Zealand, has a narrow footprint and an angled site placement to provide loads of natural light and cross-ventilation. 

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  Using a Hydrotech roofing system, Carver & Schicketanz created a low-maintenance green roof using native plants such as California oat and red fescue. 

    Using a Hydrotech roofing system, Carver & Schicketanz created a low-maintenance green roof using native plants such as California oat and red fescue. 

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  Stucco walls, a galvanized-metal roof, and concrete floors all contribute to the passive design of the hacienda-inspired Courtyard House. Window-walls and thermal chimney skylights take advantage of western breezes to create natural air-conditioning. 

    Stucco walls, a galvanized-metal roof, and concrete floors all contribute to the passive design of the hacienda-inspired Courtyard House. Window-walls and thermal chimney skylights take advantage of western breezes to create natural air-conditioning. 

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  A clever radiant barrier house wrap repels heat and bounces back into the atmosphere in this affordable townhome in Houston, Texas. The wood floors throughout the condos are recycled gym floors from nearby schools.  Photo by Jack Thompson.

    A clever radiant barrier house wrap repels heat and bounces back into the atmosphere in this affordable townhome in Houston, Texas. The wood floors throughout the condos are recycled gym floors from nearby schools.

    Photo by Jack Thompson.
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  British architects Sheppard Robson created a vertical void, called a wind catcher, which functions as a low-tech passive cooling system. Originally designed and used in Persian cities, it pulls cool air down from the roof level and disperses a light breeze throughout the home.  
    British architects Sheppard Robson created a vertical void, called a wind catcher, which functions as a low-tech passive cooling system. Originally designed and used in Persian cities, it pulls cool air down from the roof level and disperses a light breeze throughout the home. 
     
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