written by:
April 28, 2014
As city populations grow, we continue to squeeze the most out of every square foot in our living spaces. These five infill homes manage to slip through the cracks.
Narrow brick house in Toronto.

On a 16-foot wide lot in a leafy Toronto neighborhood, architect Donald Chung devised a 2,100-square-foot home with three levels and series of double-height rooms and staircases. Photo by Dean Kaufman

Originally appeared in 5 Small and Narrow Modern Houses
1 / 5
Kitchen dining room with salvaged cabinets

GRO Architects, Richard Garber and Nicole Robertson, took an unusual request from a client who bought a $45,000 corner lot in Jersey City and had only a $250,000 budget. The resulting cedar-slat home has a cantilevered deck with views of the Statue of Liberty, airy bright rooms, and space for a small garden. Photo by Samantha Contis

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Garden Statement
2 / 5
Segal’s urban-infill units (like the Titan shown here) eschew typical features like dysfunctional balconies and underground garages.

In San Diego, Jonathan Segal, is leading the march to infill projects with his coterie of 245 modern homes on odd and unused lots. He’s adamant that smart, simple housing can be built for a lot less than big, bad apartment blocks, which makes him more than a little frustrated. “Our stuff is less expensive than sucky architecture,” he fumes, “but you can’t mandate good design.” Here, his Titan tower eschews balconies and underground garages in favor of clean lines, sunny courtyards, and sunny rooms. Photo by Randi Berez

Photo by 
Originally appeared in The Jonathan
3 / 5
The cleaned-up, refined front that was approved by the planning commission would be easily recognized by the house's original inhabitants.

A 900-square-foot infill on San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill took six years to create, due to red tape and historic restrictions, but the finished contemporary translation of a Victorian bungalow was well worth the effort. Photo by Zubin Shroff

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Worth the Wait
4 / 5
olson kundig art stable

Tom Kundig’s mixed-use infill project in Seattle, Washington, uses an 80-foot-tall hinge for hand-cranked doors. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

Originally appeared in 10 Olson Kundig Houses
5 / 5
Narrow brick house in Toronto.

On a 16-foot wide lot in a leafy Toronto neighborhood, architect Donald Chung devised a 2,100-square-foot home with three levels and series of double-height rooms and staircases. Photo by Dean Kaufman

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...