Winners: Cleantech Corridor Competition

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October 10, 2010

We're excited to showcase the winners of the Los Angeles Cleantech Corridor and Green District Competition, sponsored by SCI-Arc and The Architect’s Newspaper. The competition asked a slew of creative types, from architects and environmentalists to students and landscape designers, to re-imagine a new, mixed-use future for the Cleantech Corridor, a 2,000-acre development zone on the eastern edge of downtown Los Angeles. An exhibition of the winning projects will be on view at SCI-ARC in Los Angeles from October 9-27, so if you happen to be in Los Angeles this month, do try to stop by and check out the best in show. A hearty congratulations to the winners and finalists, and to all that participated. See below for more on the top two winning concepts.

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  The Cleantech Corridor cuts a wide swath through L.A.'s downtown for four miles along the Los Angeles River.
    The Cleantech Corridor cuts a wide swath through L.A.'s downtown for four miles along the Los Angeles River.
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  Professional Category First Place Award of $5,000: UMBRELLA by Constantin Boincean, Ralph Bertram; Aleksandra Danielak Oslo Norway

Statement from Project Umbrella team:  [The concept] "reinterprets LA’s existing infrastructure by implementing a point-based renewal strategy that will gradually transform the city grid into a greener and more attractive public space. Mushroom-like structures named solar evaporators tap into the city’s sewage, collecting and clarifying the black water originating from the surrounding blocks.
    Professional Category First Place Award of $5,000: UMBRELLA by Constantin Boincean, Ralph Bertram; Aleksandra Danielak Oslo Norway Statement from Project Umbrella team: [The concept] "reinterprets LA’s existing infrastructure by implementing a point-based renewal strategy that will gradually transform the city grid into a greener and more attractive public space. Mushroom-like structures named solar evaporators tap into the city’s sewage, collecting and clarifying the black water originating from the surrounding blocks.
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  The clear water is distributed and released into the streets through a process of evaporation and condensation triggering a transformation into a network of lush, cultivated landscapes.
    The clear water is distributed and released into the streets through a process of evaporation and condensation triggering a transformation into a network of lush, cultivated landscapes.
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  Green webs spreading out from the evaporators generate incentives for new, sustainable developments. The central urban plazas become focal points for a gradual process of transformation that will affect the way people will see, use, and experience their city.”
    Green webs spreading out from the evaporators generate incentives for new, sustainable developments. The central urban plazas become focal points for a gradual process of transformation that will affect the way people will see, use, and experience their city.”
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  Student Category First Place Award of $2,000: MessyTECH by Randall Winston, Jennifer Jones, and Renee Pean / University of Virginia School of Architecture. 

Statement from Messytech team:  “MessyTech recognizes the full life cycles involved in “clean” industries, which can be complex and not perfectly clean.
    Student Category First Place Award of $2,000: MessyTECH by Randall Winston, Jennifer Jones, and Renee Pean / University of Virginia School of Architecture. Statement from Messytech team: “MessyTech recognizes the full life cycles involved in “clean” industries, which can be complex and not perfectly clean.
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  In turn, messy processes can lead to cleaner ones. Designing and manufacturing are inherently messy, where error can lead to progress and where flexibility reigns. Creativity and artistry are fostered in environments of cross-pollination and collaboration, where conflict and harmony co-generate good ideas.
    In turn, messy processes can lead to cleaner ones. Designing and manufacturing are inherently messy, where error can lead to progress and where flexibility reigns. Creativity and artistry are fostered in environments of cross-pollination and collaboration, where conflict and harmony co-generate good ideas.
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  The weaving of diverse infrastructures, people, and activities makes for a rich and dynamic urban fabric.”
An exhibition   of the winning projects will be on view at SCI-ARC in Los Angeles from  October 9-27,  so if you're in town, try to stop by to check out the  work before the end of the month.

To read more about the competition, check out Alissa Walker's preview coverage and interview with Sam Lubell, California editor of The Architect's Newspaper, and Peter Zellner, principal of the architecture firm ZELLNERPLUS and cultural studies coordinator at the Southern California Institute of Architecture. The pair participated in a panel discussion about the project during our 2010 Dwell on Design conference in June.
    The weaving of diverse infrastructures, people, and activities makes for a rich and dynamic urban fabric.” An exhibition of the winning projects will be on view at SCI-ARC in Los Angeles from October 9-27, so if you're in town, try to stop by to check out the work before the end of the month. To read more about the competition, check out Alissa Walker's preview coverage and interview with Sam Lubell, California editor of The Architect's Newspaper, and Peter Zellner, principal of the architecture firm ZELLNERPLUS and cultural studies coordinator at the Southern California Institute of Architecture. The pair participated in a panel discussion about the project during our 2010 Dwell on Design conference in June.

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