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New Danish Designs for UN HQ

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Sixty years ago, Danish architect Finn Juhl designed the interior of the Trusteeship Council Chamber at the United Nations headquarters in New York City. The space is undergoing a major restoration and renovation, and when it's completed in approximately two years, the works of a new generation of Danish designers will also grace the space. In December, the Danish Arts Foundation Committee for Crafts and Design invited five designers to participate in a furniture competition to "reinvent Danish classics" and last week, the winner was announced.

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  In the presence of the queen of Denmark in a ceremony at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the committee awarded Kasper Salto and Thomas Sigsgaard as the winners of the competition. Shown here is a rendering of their meeting table and chair designs. Salto and Sigsgaard clearly took inspiration from Arne Jacobsen's Swan Chair for Fritz Hansen, originally designed for the Royal Hotel in Copenhagen in 1958.
    In the presence of the queen of Denmark in a ceremony at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the committee awarded Kasper Salto and Thomas Sigsgaard as the winners of the competition. Shown here is a rendering of their meeting table and chair designs. Salto and Sigsgaard clearly took inspiration from Arne Jacobsen's Swan Chair for Fritz Hansen, originally designed for the Royal Hotel in Copenhagen in 1958.
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  Shown here is Salto and Sigsgaard's design for the chamber. Each designer's challenge for the competition was to "prove that they could master the task of experimenting within the internationally renowned Danish furniture tradition, while respecting the legacy of one of its greatest masters, Finn Juhl."
    Shown here is Salto and Sigsgaard's design for the chamber. Each designer's challenge for the competition was to "prove that they could master the task of experimenting within the internationally renowned Danish furniture tradition, while respecting the legacy of one of its greatest masters, Finn Juhl."
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  Christian Flindt was another designer invited to participate in the competition. His design for a meeting table that can quickly be moved out of the way was quite appealing (save for the strange metal contraption with wheels, seemingly making the table legs redundant). Here the table is shown assembled and ready to be used.
    Christian Flindt was another designer invited to participate in the competition. His design for a meeting table that can quickly be moved out of the way was quite appealing (save for the strange metal contraption with wheels, seemingly making the table legs redundant). Here the table is shown assembled and ready to be used.
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  In this image, the table's legs have been removed and placed on their respective hanging hooks.
    In this image, the table's legs have been removed and placed on their respective hanging hooks.
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  Here, the table has been completely disassembled and hung on the wall. Its underside creates the look of a wall panel rather than a table in storage.
    Here, the table has been completely disassembled and hung on the wall. Its underside creates the look of a wall panel rather than a table in storage.
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  Flindt's chair design is a clear nod to the work of Hans Wegner.
    Flindt's chair design is a clear nod to the work of Hans Wegner.
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  Designer Søren Ulrik Petersen's chair design also appears Wegner-inspired.
    Designer Søren Ulrik Petersen's chair design also appears Wegner-inspired.
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  Though many elements of these speaker tables are nonnegotiable, Petersen's panel details add a nice touch.
    Though many elements of these speaker tables are nonnegotiable, Petersen's panel details add a nice touch.
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  Designer Mia Gammelgaard's proposal featured clean, crisp surfaces with color accents in the chairs.
    Designer Mia Gammelgaard's proposal featured clean, crisp surfaces with color accents in the chairs.
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  Gammelgaard's task chair, with its tall, slim profile, resembles Arne Jacobsen's Oxford chair—just with cushioned pads.
    Gammelgaard's task chair, with its tall, slim profile, resembles Arne Jacobsen's Oxford chair—just with cushioned pads.
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  Designer Hans Sandgren Jakobsen's chair design also had an Oxford-like look to it.
    Designer Hans Sandgren Jakobsen's chair design also had an Oxford-like look to it.
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  Jackobsen's proposed table folds down to a slim profile for storage, though it could also easily act as long console in a pinch.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    Jackobsen's proposed table folds down to a slim profile for storage, though it could also easily act as long console in a pinch.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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