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August 8, 2013
Finishing Touch is how each issue of Dwell wraps up, by focusing on one great design detail. Turns out a lot of them involve innovative uses for wood.
modern CNC-milled desk in London home

A digitally fabricated design for a home office in London boasts secret compartments for coralling the trappings of a modern workspace.

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Originally appeared in Hidden in Plain View
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Modern interior covered with wood panels

The recent history of Janna Stark's San Francisco flat, located in an 1890's Victorian house, is literally burned into the wall. Local architects Hulett Jones and Paul Haydu of jones | haydu sliced some of the house's charred framing into strips, revealing the intricate patterning of the old-growth beams.

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© 2010 Laura Flippen Photography
Originally appeared in Wood-Paneled Interior in a San Francisco Victorian
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Modern two-story home with mirrored siding and plate-glass windows

“The first floor was about making something warm and woody that would blend into the natural environment,” architect Stephen Chung says of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home. “The second floor was a chance to experiment.”

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Originally appeared in Reflects Well
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Modern wooden peg board bookshelf

An undulating wall made from over 40,000 dowels adds a dose of awe to a Massachusetts loft. Merge Architects wrapped the peg wall around three sides of a bathroom to hide a door and provide a storage for books and knick knacks.

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Originally appeared in Catch A Wave
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<p>In 2008, students Drew Coshow, Robert Douge, Abigail Grubb, and Steven Ward designed the <a href="http://www.cadc.auburn.edu/soa/rural-studio/projects_20Kphase4.htm">Pattern Book House</a>. The name was inspired by pattern books that were popular in th

This modern log cabin from architecture students at Auburn University was designed to be completed for $20,000—an admirable solution for the down-at-heel looking to put down roots.

Originally appeared in By the Book
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Budget supplies become modern design gold in this Omaha home. Architect Randy Brown turned to a local hardware store to purchase a collection of standard two-by-four and one-by-two wood slats; he transformed the inexpensive supplies into an installation that separates his youngest son’s room from the communal living area. 

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Modern linden plywood and ash staircase cabinet

Residents of this contemporary home in Koriyama, Japan, squeeze out every cubic inch of storage, courtesy of a centuries-old design concept that combines storage with stairs.

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Copyright:ave
Originally appeared in Top Drawer
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modern CNC-milled desk in London home

A digitally fabricated design for a home office in London boasts secret compartments for coralling the trappings of a modern workspace.

Photo by James Day.

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